Replace video only, maintain callout tracks

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Is it possible to replace the video track in a project without loosing the callouts? I want to switch out my video for one saved w different quality (same vid though) but don't want to loose all the work in placing callouts, graphics etc.
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Kathy Ver Eecke

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Posted 8 years ago

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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Hi Kathy,
Yes, if you just do a delete, you will lose the callouts.

However, you can right-click each callout and choose Save to Library. This will save all the properties of the callout so you can easily add them to the new video.

This way, you won't need to remake them from scratch, you will just need to drag them back to the timeline and reposition them.

I hope this helps!
Kelly
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Kathy Ver Eecke

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Okay, that's what I am doing now. But with 70+ callouts, will be a very time consuming process. was hoping there was a faster fix.
thanks for the quick response
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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Oh dear!
Hold on! Let's see if our friend Kayakman can chime in here with a better workaround!

He also add lots of callouts to his videos and has come up with solutions for this.

I was thinking this would be good for 3 or 4!

Other Camtasia Studio users might also have a workaround.

Kelly
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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Hi,

Just so you know, I have sent an email to kayakman asking him to chime in here to give us a helping hand, if possible. Sorry for the delay.
Kelly
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Kathy Ver Eecke

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No problem Kelly. I'm almost through doing it the way we discussed. Would be good to know if for if it comes up again, but no rush here.
thanks!
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kayakman, Champion

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With 70 some callouts, Kelly's method will work very well with some clairification.

I assume the new video is identical to the old.

Use markers to mark the beginning of each callout, if there are multiple callouts that start at the same time, list them in a single marker. For each callout, the marker text should be a number, starting left to right; if multiple callouts start at same time, use a 5,6,7 text format.

When you send each callout to library, name it the same as its corresponding marker number.

Next, put a full project audio on an unused audio track; you'll use this as a marker placement template; makes no difference what the audio is. Alternatively, use a full project image clip on the PIP track.

Add a split at each marker on the audio template track clip or the PIP track clip.

Insert the new video at T=0; this will displace the old video and callouts to the right.

The template clips [audio or PIP] will still be at original time.

Move each marker [starting left to right] from old clip to split index point on template clips. You can select a marker, cut it, and paste it where it belongs under the new video [and over the split in the template clip].

With a marker in its new location, put the seek head on the marker, then select its callout in library, right click, add to timeline. This will precisely put the callouts at its original time position.

Alternatively, you could select the original callout, ctl-X to cut it, position the seek head at the new time mark, and ctl-V paste it.

Unfortunately, no short cuts to do this; but this work flow should help.

To be safe, save the original project in library just in case.
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Kathy Ver Eecke

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Thanks kayakman. I think this probably would have saved some time. Hoepfully won't have the problem again, but if I do...this is the definitely the route to take. thanks!
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kayakman, Champion

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I also should have suggested this technique in my original reply ...

Since the new video is identical to original [same dimensions but but better quality?], there actually is a easy workaround.

In original project that has all the callouts already in place, put the new video on the PIP track [it should be an AVI or MP4].

At production, the PIP content is encoded on top of main video, BUT callouts will go on top the PIP content.
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Kathy Ver Eecke

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Oh man! I did put it on the PIP track, but thought I still needed to delete the video in the video track. Wow, that would have been a 2 minute fix!
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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Wow is right!

Good call Kayakman!! Thanks so much for your help.

Okay... now we and the world know the best way to do this!

We should have thought of this right off the bat. Poor PIP track... I forget about him and his usefulness.

Kelly
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Damon Muma

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If you need to replace with a video that isn't exactly the same but shares callout tracks, one way to do it is to close Camtasia, change the name of the old camrec file, reopen the project and when it prompts you for the missing file location, choose the new version.

This won't work as well if there are any splits in the video track however.

It does make producing different language versions of mostly identical videos a little bit less frustrating.

I have to say, though.. there needs to be an option to sub-out a video track for a different one.
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Roger Ducker

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This works for keeping the markers (needed for a table of contents) when swapping out a corrected video, in Camtasia 7.
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Brad, Camtasia Studio QA

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For anyone still watching this thread, Camtasia Studio 8 should hopefully solve this issue.

In Camtasia Studio 8, callouts are no longer directly tied to video so you can simply delete the old video and then drag down the new video to replace it. Then, just line up your callouts where you want them relative to the new video. You can also use multi-selection (hold ctrl while selecting the media you want selected) to drag all of your callouts together.
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Kathy Ver Eecke

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That's great news. Thanks for the update.
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Michael Maardt

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very interesting discussion. I look for a solution to save space on my harddrive, and wondered if I could make a video WITHOUT callouts into a mp4 file. Problem is, that callouts in v. 7 is tied to the video. I might look into v. 8, if there are some things about editing-keys, that have changed and I do NOT like the changes.
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Joe Morgan

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You could always install the trial version of camtasia 8.  Version 7 and Version 8 can co-exist on the same machine. Callouts reside on a separate track in CS8. But if you render a video that has callouts in the timeline,  you will be rendering them as well. You can replace just the video and keep the callouts intact. Camtasia 9 will be coming out before long as well. You may want to wait until then. Only Camtasia knows what features may be coming.

Regards, Joe
(Edited)
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kayakman, Champion

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in latest version of CS8, you can disable the track that has all the callouts [or also disable all callout tracks if they are on multiple tracks]

then, with track[s] disabled, you can produce and only the video content will be in the new MP4

then you can simplly swap it into the project to replace your original video content
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Michael Maardt

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thanks to Joe Morgan and kayakman. I will try the latest trial version.
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Joe Morgan

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My bad. Oops,
I rendered a video as a test and accidently locked the track instead of disabling it. I never attempted to disable callouts and render a video before.
So I ran a test before running my mouth. Looks like I should have double checked my work!!!
 Not sure what good callouts are if you don't intend on rendering them though.

I would seriously think about waiting for Camtasia 9 though. Considering the cost of the Program.
Todays computer technology practically assures that it will be 64 bit Version.
The computer industry is already 64 bit and so "ALL" software must follow suit or Perish.
I can't guarantee it because I don't know. 
But out of all the video editing software available.
 Camtasia is the last "High End Video Editing Program" I am aware of that is only 32 Bit.
 So if it is 64 bit, you can utilize all the RAM on your computer. Not the 2 or 3GB's you get now.

Sorry for the misinformation.
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Michael Maardt

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Joe, I am danish. I must say, I do NOT understand first part of your post. I better try it for myself and see, what happens. btw: I am very satisfied with v. 7 AND happy that I found this forum.

One hour later after installing v8. It seems to be possible to do, what I want to do. It is not called to disable, but to TURN OFF the track. You right click the track to the left. As far as I can see, it does exactly what I wanted: create a mp4 without the callouts.

I removed the video track and inserted the mp4 without the callouts. I also deleted the audio track, because it is contained in the new mp4 file. Then something new I learned. It seems, that v8 is working with layers. The callout and the video clip can be in front OR in background, very smart.

As far as I can see: This way I can delete my large .mov files and save some space and reduce the number of video and audio files.

BUT I have to get used holding the Ctrl key down, when working on the timeline. It looks really good, I have to play a bit more.
(Edited)
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Ian Rance

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Assuming the video files are identical save for quality you could try this in Camtasia 8.

Save the project
Rename the file used in the project to something obvious - I just added an 'A' to the name.
Rename the other copy of the file with better quality with the same name as the file you renamed in the previous step
Open the Project and Camtasia will use the new file.

I used this as I had a file where there were many volume edits where one persons speech was too quiet.  Camtasia was repeatedly crashing because I was using a file over the network so I copied the file locally and avoided the problem and hours of repeat work.

Hope it helps 

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