should i compress images before using them in videos

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 1 month ago
In order to create some effects in my video, I have added multiple images (each mostly the same but with small differences). The result is how I want it, but I am not sure if this will make the video bulky or not. Should I be compressing images using e.g tinypng.com first or does this make no difference once the video is shared? thx
Photo of camtasia

camtasia

  • 25 Posts
  • 5 Reply Likes
  • like it

Posted 1 month ago

  • 1
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 8070 Posts
  • 4366 Reply Likes
In most cases.Compressing an image will only compromise its quality.

Heres whats more important.
Camtasia's canvas area has a maximum area/dimension of  4096 x 4096 pixels.
Images exceeding those dimensions Horizontally, Vertically or Overall. Will be Re-sized and Re-sampled by Camtasia.
Most image editors will resize an image better. Retaining more quality.
Camtasia will do a decent job with most images. If you load  panoramas and images exceeding 6,000 pixels or so,the quality will drop off exponentially.

Regards,Joe 
Photo of camtasia

camtasia

  • 25 Posts
  • 5 Reply Likes
Although I do believe quality is important, my question was more: Am I bulking up this video, which in turn will take longer for the user to download/play later on
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 8070 Posts
  • 4366 Reply Likes
No, the video is a separate entity.
When you render a video, everything is compressed. A high quality PNG or Tiff is compressed down to the same quality level of the video.
High quality images compress with better end results than lower quality images.
Photo of camtasia

camtasia

  • 25 Posts
  • 5 Reply Likes
Great. thx
Photo of David B. Demyan

David B. Demyan

  • 83 Posts
  • 85 Reply Likes
Great response, Joe! I'll add my best practices on the broader subject of pre-compression.

DO trim or crop to frame your subjects better in images imported to your editing program (any editor: Camtasia, Premiere, Photoshop, PowerPoint, Illustrator, After Effects, etc.) Whether you are producing stills or movies, your final results will be improved.

DON'T compress anything before loading it to your editor. That includes any and all assets: Videos, images, audio, fonts. Let your editing program do the final compression and render. The only result you will get from compressing or using highly compressed formats on your canvas is lower quality.

NOTE that I recognize the overhead in computing resources this can impose. My remedy is to get a better computer to preserve top quality. Many producers, myself included, make appropriate comprises when required.