Smooth scrolling end credits, how to?

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 2 months ago
  • (Edited)
For the life of me I can't seem to get a smooth scrolling end credit using a text callout. No matter what I do, it's jerky coming up from the bottom. Seems like the more text there is, the worse the jerky-ness. Can anyone help? Thx! 



Ps. I have tried all the easing options.
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
  • confused

Posted 3 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7370 Posts
  • 4033 Reply Likes
First off, smooth scrolling text callouts have been something Camtasia 8 could never pull off  either.

However, a still image will scroll very smoothly.
If you have access to Photoshop or anything along that line, this is what I would do. Create a PNG the same width as you project and long enough to contain all of your end credits. Type in your credits.
Import and scroll it.

This is a solution I came up with 3 years ago and I'm sure it still works today.

Regards,Joe
(Edited)
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
Awesome Joe, I was just about to fire up FCP and build the credits there... but this sounds faster. But what a pain... if the credits change :) 
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
Even faster, I just screen captured the credit role, then grouped the screen capture with the text-editable callout (turned that off), and I'm good to go. Not perfect, but good enough. Good lord. I usually do everything in FCP and Motion, but this time I have tons of screen captures so I thought I could just do everything in Camtasia. I guess quality suffers a bit here?

(Edited)
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7370 Posts
  • 4033 Reply Likes
As long as you can live with it.
Yeah,Camtasia falls short with regards to high quality animations.
Photo of Paul Middlin

Paul Middlin, Employee

  • 989 Posts
  • 235 Reply Likes
Is the jerkiness still there when you produce the video out? Some things are slow to render inside the editor/preview, but still come out as expected when the real video is made.
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
thx Paul. No, it's smoother inside than out - I've got a fast iMac :) I tried recreating the call out animation from scratch, and that helped a lot. Something must have gotten bungled. 
Photo of Paul Middlin

Paul Middlin, Employee

  • 989 Posts
  • 235 Reply Likes
Weird, but, glad it's working better.
Photo of brucerothwell

brucerothwell

  • 299 Posts
  • 85 Reply Likes
Found a trick for this you can try, but may yield marginal results with text, due to readability issues (for image-based content, it seems to work fine):
  1. Make at least 2 copies of the object on the timeline.
  2. Place each copy above the original
  3. Offset the first copy by 1-3 frames to the right of the original.
  4. Offset the 2nd one by 1-3 frames to the right of the first copy.
  5. Set the transparency of each to 33%.
  6. Pull the end edges of the copies back, to line up with the original end point.
  7. Test render a segment.
  8. If looks good, render the whole piece, and place the rendered clip on the timeline, locking the tracks of the objects.
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
Thx Bruce. I'm okay now (just ignoring the problem). What you propose looks interesting, but too much work for an end credit :) 
Photo of yezid.are

yezid.are

  • 1 Post
  • 1 Reply Like
It is disappointing that a video editing software does not have a straight forward easy way to just type in the rolling credits at the end of each video. This really makes me question my decision to go this way, this being something so simple and basic.
Photo of MeirG

MeirG

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Indeed it is very disappointing! Can't stress it enough!!!
It is more so, since the building blocks for implementing this are existing already: The Text callout editor is perfect as it is and all one need is to create an unlimited long text object and scrol it across the canvas. An import of Word file will be a nice touch too.
Please folks. Vote it up!
Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 633 Posts
  • 213 Reply Likes
I've never seen jerky text. Just created this in Camtasia Mac 2019 on my laptop using custom animation.

(Edited)
Photo of MeirG

MeirG

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
30 Seconds are fine, I can do it too with an elongated "Text" box annotation. However, can you make it long enough as in a feature film with two, three or even more minutes?
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7370 Posts
  • 4033 Reply Likes
Hey MeirG,

You can string multiple callouts together by grouping them.

In the example below I've dragged and re-positioned 4 text callouts in the order of appearance.

This is a 1920 x 1080 video. The canvas only zooms out so far. I’m zoomed out all the way and using 4 callouts. There scaled vertically as large as they go. Somewhere around 4,000 pixels is as tall as they get. Same goes for width.


Using Windows...........You select all callouts to highlight them. Right click and select Group.

The technique for grouping on a Mac may be slightly different? I don’t use a Mac, although I know they added grouping to Mac a few years ago.

Once grouped, you can position the group accordingly and apply the animation.

On Windows you right click the animation to change easing from "Auto/Exponential In/Out" to "Linear".

In davemillman's video the text starts slow, speeds up to a pace, then slows down at the end. That's Exponential In/Out.

Linear will give you a constant speed.

If you need more callout than the canvas can display zoomed out. Group the maximum number that fits, slide the group up until the bottom is at the top of the screen. Position callouts underneath. Select the group and the new callouts, group again. 

Regards, Joe 

Photo of MeirG

MeirG

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Dear @Joe Morgan
Thanks for the detailed explanation and the effort to make it.
But there must be a better way and we the people (-; must push for another "callout" named "Scrolling text" that will allow us to concentrate on creating videos and not on kludging the tools.
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5788 Posts
  • 2758 Reply Likes
Hi there

Camtasia has been designed for recording screen activity. Mostly, tutorials and "show me how to do it" types of videos. Given it's humble beginnings, it's no surprise that a feature such as end credits is absent from the program. And honestly, I'm doubtful as to how soon something like this would be added in.

I note that you aren't happy with the workaround that Joe offered. Perhaps this other workaround may help?

There exists another application that is free and is called "Hitfilm Express". And based on this YouTube tutorial I found, it appears that it's a lot simpler to achieve what you are looking for. So my thought is that perhaps you could use it to create your end credit scroll, push it out as a video, then add it to Camtasia to easily achieve your goal?


Photo of MeirG

MeirG

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Dear Rick,
Joe Morgan's work around is fine and I will use it where called for. But may be your idea might be easier. I'll check it out right away...
Thanks!
Meir

Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 633 Posts
  • 213 Reply Likes
I apologise in advance for insulting compainers (not Joe or Rick!) in this video. Please spend a minimum of two minutes (including render) trying something before complaining here about "kludging the tools."

Presenting "two, three or even more minutes" of credits, created in Camtasia in less time than it took me to type this snippy reply. Sorry again for that.


(Edited)
Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 633 Posts
  • 213 Reply Likes
Here's the 3 minutes of scrolling credits created in my snippy video above. Again, sorry for that.
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5773 Posts
  • 2756 Reply Likes
LMAO on sitting through the render! Love it.
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5773 Posts
  • 2756 Reply Likes
Also like that you demonstrate how to make this a project of its own. I think that is very helpful to break out that segment and make it simpler for folks to comprehend.
Photo of MeirG

MeirG

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Dear @davemilman
Thank you for the demo. Can you please clarify what media did you import and into what callout? Also what tool did you use to create the imported credits media?
Thanks and sorry for hurting your feelings by using "Kludge"...
Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 633 Posts
  • 213 Reply Likes
@MeirG,

In my first video yesterday (Lorem Ipsum) I used a Camtasia text callout and a custom animation.

In my second video today (The Big Star: Joe) I created the credit text in PowerPoint because PowerPoint has more robust text formatting capability (tabs) and easy export of any object(s) as a PNG. The video shows importing "credits.png" into the Camtasia media bin. Then I stretched that PNG object to a duration of 3 minutes on the timeline and added the custom animation. I did not use a callout for that example.

The PNG is attached below.
Photo of MeirG

MeirG

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks!
May be TechSmith will use it for a tutorial. That could be helpful to many, isn't it?
Regards
Meir
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7370 Posts
  • 4033 Reply Likes
I used to advice the same technique.Except using Photoshop or some other image editing software to create the text.

  Here’s the main reason I no longer do. 4K monitors and screen recordings.Camtasia re-scales anything over 4096 pixels.In either direction. It doesn't do a Cracker Jack job either.

 If you scrolled the equivalent of 4 full screen images of text through a 4K production. Large text starts getting soft edges.

Small text can start looking pretty rough. If you look at his image, it shows a 1,000 x 8,480 png image of text.Placed in a 4K project in Camtasia. Its scaled to 100% for optimum clarity.


Heres what the exported screen shot of that text looks like. If you view this at 100% scale. The degradation speaks for itself.

Smaller fonts would look worse yet. With larger fonts looking cleaner.

 

If you were working a 1920 x 1080 production. You can get nearly 4 full screen images without any re-scaling. 1080 x 4 = 4320. So the re-scaling is minor down to 4096.

So working this way will give mixed results. Leaving you scratching your head. Wondering why it works well sometimes. But not always.  Re-scaling images of any size can have a negative effect.They darn sure don't look better afterward. }:>)


For context.........

If you have a 6,000 x 4,000-pixel image. Its rescaled by Camtasia as soon as it hits the timeline.No way to prevent it either.I've consulted with tech support over this.

So images scaled set to 100%. Appearing outside of the canvas area. Are still Camtasia re-scaled.

You’re better off re-scaling in Photoshop and importing the smaller image. Because Photoshop re-scales much better than Camtasia.  Images are another topic. But understanding this is important.

I was debating this issue in another thread. The poster insisted you could create 25,000 x 1080 images and scrolling text  without degradation. This was Camtasia 9, about 2 years ago.

Here’s what a 25,000 by 100-pixel image of text looks like when placed in a 1080p project. Its horrendous.


It's not like you can't use the technique, its important to understand the rules.

There may be a technique for using using large pdf's. PDF's import as vector so scaling might not be an issue??? Last I checked pdf's has a maximum size of 200 x 200 inches. Which might even crash Camtasia?
This isn't my hill to die on.I don't need long rolling credits. I may give pdf's a whirl one day?See what happens.

Food for thought.....Regards,Joe
Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 633 Posts
  • 213 Reply Likes
Joe, thanks for the details. 4096 pixels isn't very big.

The PNG I used was 10,380 pixels tall. Did you detect the re-scaling effect in my videos?  

Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7370 Posts
  • 4033 Reply Likes

Yes, I did Dave.

Being a Windows user. I find myself on shaky ground when delving into Mac operating system issues. I tend to tread lightly in situations like this. After I downloaded your video. I felt comfortable enough to jump in with both feet. Thanks for making it.

I exported a frame of your video to PNG. Opened it in Photoshop.

I used Abby Finereader to extract the text. Copied and pasted it directly below your image.

The font appears to be Arial Regular. I used 51-point text. I had to adjust Leading to 58. As the default setting was too low.

I moved the last line of text to the top. For ease of direct comparisons.

The videos text has soft edges. As if feathering were applied. The dots above the letter i have lost their sharp corners, fading into the background.


I too was taken aback, learning anything larger than 4096 pixels. Was subject to automatic re-scaling. I wrote around 4,000 pixels in my earlier post. I decided to look up what tech support actually said. Granted, Camtasia is primarily a screen recorder.

However, this parameter is long overdue for an overhaul/enlargement.

The 25,000 x 100 png text example in my previous post. Was actually 30,000 x 100. I still have it. The image looks flawless in Premiere Pro. Which can edit 7680 x 4320 8K video. So there’s some logic to why this is.

 I threw it in there this morning and created a screen shot. I even used the same background image.



The post I was referring to was about images. Morphing into text along the way.

Here's a side by side comparison of a  21,316 x 3,696 pixel Panorama open in Camtasia.  And zoomed into with at a simular scale in photo viewer on the right. I couldn't type an exact figure into the photo viewer for a 100% scale example.

The dashed outlines are cloned and identical in size. This indicates how accurate or inaccurate my scaling comparison is.Depending upon how you interpret it.

 

Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 633 Posts
  • 213 Reply Likes
Thanks, Joe. Clicking each of the images in your last post to view them fullscreen makes the effect you describe quite obvious. It would be great if Techsmith weighed in here to give us an update.