Snagit 12 compatible with Windows XP?

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  • Updated 5 years ago
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Snagit 12 email announcement said "(requires Windows 7 and above or Mac OS X 10.8 and above)".  Is that a typo or has TechSmith decided to stop selling to Windows XP customers?
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rekees

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Posted 6 years ago

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Jennifer Bedford, Official Rep

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Thank you for continuing to use Snagit.  With Microsoft's announcement that they would no longer be offering support for Windows XP, we made the decision to only support Windows 7 and above on all future releases.  If you have version 11, you can continue to use that on XP as long as you like.  Although we do not currently support Windows XP, you can still try Snagit 12 on it to see if it will work for you, but we have not tested 12 with Windows XP.  If you would like to try version 12, you can download a free trial here: http://bit.ly/trySnagit.  You should be able to install it in addition to Snagit 11 on your device.  If it works for you, you can upgrade to 12.  If not, you can uninstall 12 and continue with version 11.
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Lynn Fredricks

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Since many vendors are not giving up on XP support for the foreseeable future, so will continue to need to take screenshots on XP desktops, that's very unfortunate.
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Jennifer Bedford, Official Rep

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Hi Lynn,
As always, this update is an optional one.  If you need to use Snagit with Windows XP, you are welcome to stay on version 11 for as long as you need.
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Ayoub Tech

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It's Very Shame That You Stop Making Compatible Programs For Xp 
This System Is A Very Simple System Any Body Can understand it Not Like 8 Or Even 7
You know How Much users Around The World That They steel using Xp
How Ever Your Company Will Lose Alot of users
I Wish That Tech Smith May Make A New Version 12.2 That May Include 
Xp Users
All Respect 
AB
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Ayoub Tech

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Don't Tell Me To Try It If He Will Work For My Xp I tried But Always This program Needs A new Windows Version Wich Means I can't Have It 
Since I Seen Snagit 12 I Did Do Want it But It Seems That I Can't have it
Even I Want it Bad Because IT seems  So Amazing 
All Respect 
AB
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Stepen Raj

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i need sangit 12 for xp sp2
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Stepen Raj

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Snagit version 12 is bullshit. CRAP Product. unable to install in xp
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Joe Morgan

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You can't install a engine control computer for a 2014 Corvette in a 1996 Corvette and get it to run either.

What you could do is install SnagIt 11 and activate it using a SnagIt 12 Key. Obviously, you need to purchase a key to do that. If you upgrade your computer, the same key will still work for a SnagIt 12 install on the new machine.

You can download and install a new or an older version from this link. Selecting the "Free Trial" Icon will download the newest version.

 http://www.techsmith.com/download.html

I run Windows 8.  I think XP is CRAP.
Regards, Joe
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Manny Carvalho, Champion

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There's nothing wrong with using old outdated operating systems.  It is, however, foolish to think that newer versions of any software will function with the old operating system.  XP can remain a viable option but users need to remain with the software built specifically for it.  That's how the computer world works and taking potshots at any new software for not working in outdated operating systems clearly comes from a lack of understanding of how the world works.  Here's the bottom line, want to use XP then use software built for it and don't try to force a big old foot into a tiny slipper.
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Joe Morgan

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For the most part I agree with you Manny. However, security updates are no longer generated by Microsoft for XP. So if you want to be online, I'm thinking  XP is a bit risky. Not fully qualified on the subject. Actually, not qualified at all.
I had to navigate through the XP menus for a friend a few weeks back. I sure don't miss that set up.
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Lynn Fredricks

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Manny,

Your generalization is over the top. It is not foolish to think that software will function on a non-current operating system; as a software vendor, it is foolish not to have at least some backwards compatibility. It is rare for even Apple to ONLY support the newest version, except in a very few rare instances where its an easier sell (like in dev tools, or when the do a free OS update).

It takes an operating system quite a bit of time to achieve enough marketshare to outweigh previous releases of the OS. Think of each previous version as a "block" of market. How many "blocks" can you afford to ignore, and what is the total value of each block? Two blocks may have a similar percentage, yet one may be more valuable than another depending on your target market.

XP still has a marketshare, though a shrinking one. In the case of Techsmith products, its a two part problem: Techsmith doesn't want to support XP, yet customers may need to screen capture from XP. Their only recourse is to use a previous version as Jennifer suggests or, they might consider looking at another option. When that happens, the Techsmith solution is no longer the only one, and they are competing to keep their own customer.
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Manny Carvalho, Champion

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It would be over the top if we weren't discussing an obsolete operating system but we are.  Let's face it, not even MS supports it so why should any other vendor?  Non-supported systems are insecure, outdated and a bit dangerous to use.  Users who want to stay in the past need to use not only caution but software specifically designed for that system.  In this case if users need a screenshot the old version of Snagit will do it just fine and TS has never been the only solution around.  They happen to be the best but they can't be everything for everybody.  If they tried that route - such as working on a new XP compatible Snagit - they wouldn't be around for long.  Stuff gets old, one has to move on or stick to past products.
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Lynn Fredricks

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That is an oversimplification. What is relevant is the number of target customers that are actually using the operating system and still likely to buy third party software.
The former is why MS is still supporting embedded versions of Windows XP through April 2019.  You can also be sure that MS is supporting whatever is on their corporate support contract plans for however long they go. Sure, they may not be renewing that support for XP, but important customers (like very large corporations) that have slow migrations, its what you do.

What's good for Microsoft or any other OS vendor isn't necessarily what's good for the third party software market or their users. If I were releasing a product in 2015, I wouldn't bother with XP support either - between early 2014 to now, XP has lost quite a bit of market share.  But if I had released an upgrade (updating existing code base rather than a brand new code base) to a software product in the first half of 2014 (and I released a few then),  Id have given it some serious thought.

A year ago, I think it was a bad idea to cut XP support; now its not as big an issue because other versions of Windows have been eating away at it.
(Edited)
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Manny Carvalho, Champion

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This is mixing apples with oranges to get fruit salad.  I really have nothing further to say.  Jenniffer explaine

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