Sound delay on video

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  • Problem
  • Updated 4 months ago
  • (Edited)
I've been using Camtasia 2018 for Windows for a few days to do very simple editing. For the first two days, everything was great - imported mp3s, added an image, added open and closing music, produce. Now, whenever I import an mp3, the...I don't know what they're called...the visual audio on the mp3 doesn't match where the handle is. 

There is a delay happening somewhere, but I can't figure it out. So, for instance...I took the handles and highlighted a place in my mp3 that did not show any audio...blank space. But when I play that highlighted space back, there is audio on it.

Is this a known issue? I've just started back with Camtasia, but I seem to remember something like this happening years ago, where I had to go into Audacity and edit the audio so that it was synced to the visual audio.

ETA: I have attempted to import the mp3s that DID work correctly, and they now have a delay also...so it's not an issue with the new mp3s I'm attempting to edit.

Does that make sense to anyone? (God, I hope so...)

Here's a screenshot to help my woefully inadequate explanation of the issue...
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antigurugirl

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  • very confused!

Posted 4 months ago

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erik.groenhaug

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Same happened here, but the latest build of camtasia works better.
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Joe Morgan

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Camtasia hates mp3's is the most likely reason why. Primarily variably bit mp3's.

Had you converted the audio to before importing it. 44,100 Hz 16 bit .wav. You would probably have no issues.

I created that image for Camtasia 8. But the same rule , unfortunately can still apply.
I'd bet the farm that's whats going on with you.

Regards,Joe
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antigurugirl

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I'll convert it, and see if that helps! I can't understand why it was working, then started getting wonky.

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Joe Morgan

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It was always a fickle problem. Let us know how it turns out. {:>)
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antigurugirl

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Converting it to a .wav file did work, but made the file 5 times larger. Converting it to a M4A file did the trick.

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Joe Morgan

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The idea behind converting it .wav is its an uncompressed format. So yes the file will be very large.
The mp3 is already a highly compressed audio file.Meaning when it was produced, most of the audio information is discarded.
The only information left is generally whats required to sound pleasing to your ears. With nothing left over for re-compressing.

M4A is the new MP3. Its a highly compressed format. So your new audio file has discarded even more audio information to create the m4a. Under close scrutiny, depending on the audio. Degradation is usually not hard to detect.  Perhaps it still sounds relativly unaffected?

However, you still have one bridge to cross. Final Render. The audio will be compressed yet again. If sound quality survives this round.Great!
If it doesn't, replace with .wav and re-produce.

Regards,Joe