Teachable Has A Max 2 Gig file size - About How Many Minutes Is That At 1280X720 Export?

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I'm wondering if anyone has an idea of maximum minutes for a 1280X720 export for maximum 2 Gig file size. Right now I have a almost 2 hour project and wondering how I need to break that up so I can upload to Teachable.
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larry

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Posted 1 week ago

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davemillman

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THis is very hard to say, because you have many choices that determine the file size of your produced content. You'll get the most accurate answer by producing a one minute sample of your work at several different quality levels (see below), observing the resulting file sizes, and doing the math. SHARE>>LOCAL FILE>>




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Rick Stone

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The very beauty of using video for teaching is the ability to go back and listen again to something you missed as well as to pause and resume.

Even though it's easy to stop and start a video,  I would seriously re-think creating a single video that is two hours in duration.

Surely there are smaller chunks that it can be broken into that would each serve as a single lesson that is just a part of a larger overall course.

Then again, it's your class and only you can determine what the best approach is for you.

Cheers... Rick :)
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JMichaelTX

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@Rick Stone

I completely agree.  It is hard to image anyone sitting still, or having the time available, for two hours at a sitting.

So, while a bunch of shorter clips would be preferred, the issue is how does the author/instructor present a Table of  Contents with links to each segment for ease of use.

If you display on your own web site, this is easy to do, but not so much on general purpose video sites like YouTube, Vimeo, and I assume Teachable.  However, YouTube does offer a way to provide a TOC index to your video.  Just enter one line for each section, providing the time code (in mm:ss) and section title in the Youtube description.  You can do this manually, or use Camtasia Markers, as shown here:
  How to Create a YouTube Table of Contents with Camtasia 

The TOC in the YouTube Description looks like this, with a link in each time code:

Table of Contents
00:00 - Introduction
01 05 - Camtasia 2018 Overview
02 54 - Performance improvements
08 45 - New Features
11 23 - Conclusions

I don't know about other video streaming services.  If anyone knows about other services, please post.
(Edited)
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Rick Stone

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Actually, sites like Teachable offer up that TOC functionality as part of the package. I'm not sure how they would allow managing something where a TOC would point at a time segment of a really long video. Generally speaking, you break a course down to essentially chapters and lessons, then upload shorter video segments for each lesson.

I do like the Teachable structure and platform. It's very similar to the Udemy platform in the way it operates. But with far less hassle. 

Cheers... Rick :)
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larry

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Thanks everyone. After running some tests at the highest quality possible settings, I have figured out that the Camtasia Encoder does not properly downsize from 1920X1080 to 1280X720 during the export process. The Camtasia encoder causes a significant and distinct distortion of resolution *when downsizing*, which I mentioned in a live chat with them, but they believe it is acceptable. Unfortunately.

Fortunately, I figured out two workarounds:

1) Export at the full 1920X1080 size at maximum resolution and then downsize to 1280X720 in Quicktime - that produces great results and is acceptable.

2) Although Teachable recommends a 1280X720 video size, I have now learned that Teachable accepts a 1920X1080 upload size and retains that size after upload at high quality, and so I will be uploading to Teachable at the full 1920X1080 size.

It's unfortunate that the tech team at Camtasia is okay with substandard exports, but, at least everything else has been working quite well for me. Overall, I am very happy with the software.

I also now know that a 55 minute video at 1920X1080 at maximum resolution is about 1.2 Gigs - so, plenty of room left over for uploading at Teachable with a 2 gig max.

Larry

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davemillman

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Larry,

I'm really confused by this comment: 

the Camtasia Encoder does not properly downsize from 1920X1080 to 1280X720 during the export process. The Camtasia encoder causes a significant and distinct distortion of resolution *when downsizing*, which I mentioned in a live chat with them, but they believe it is acceptable.  
I've been using Camtasia Studio since 2002 and Camtasia Mac since it was released, and haven't ever experienced this over dozens of commercial projects. But if that is what happens on your productions, so be it.

Here's another option for you. Export at 1080 maximum quality, then upload to YouTube. Let Google's data centers do the compression and size reduction. Then, as the uploader, you can download all the 5 sizes that YouTube creates (including 720). Their compression algorithms are very good now for most types of content.


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larry

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Dave,
Maybe try a side by side comparison of an export from a 1080p timeline with a downsize to 720p, and then try either your youtube suggestion or mine and use quicktime to downsize the 1080 output to 720, and I think you'll see a difference when it comes to looking at fine print on a website - it is muddied on the Camtasia export (just the downsized version - not the full size 1920X1080 output - that looks fine).
Fortunately, I can actually upload a 1920X1080 video to Teachable, which I did not know when I originally posted this, and I prefer that size anyway - best possible resolution for the viewer.
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davemillman

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Larry,

I made a classic forum blunder: spouted out an "expert" opinion without the facts to back me up. I did the test, to prove I was right, and the results were...I was wrong. When I produced a 1080 timeline at 720, the results were muddy. Even when I manually changed the project canvas to 720 and resized all the content (which consists of many 1080 animations), the result was muddy. This suggests that Camtasia is not resizing the incoming animations well, among other things. 

I changed my workflow years ago to create all the source animation content at delivery resolution, which is has been 1080 for the last few years. That's why I wasn't aware of the issue you uncovered here. 

So yea, it's real. If anybody is interested, here are the three test files. I didn't just post them to Vimeo so that there would be no Vimeo compression. The zip file is 11.5 MB. https://www.dropbox.com/s/64bsjim6hdgwa9p/720%20test%20do%20not%20delete.zip?dl=0
  • 1080 test.mp4: My original video, created and produced at 1080
  • 720 test.mp4: 1080 canvas, produced at 720
  • 720 native.mp4: 720 canvas, everything scaled down inside camtasia, produced at 720
  • Settings.png: The settings I used for all the tests (changing only the production resolution)
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larry

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I appreciate you doing the test Dave. Indeed, I was disappointed with how that 720 looked after being downsized, but perhaps even more disappointed that Camtasia is okay with that.
In other news about 720p, last week I tried out their Fuse software on my mobile - Fuse loads video directly from mobile into Camtasia. So, I thought that'd be handy, and used it. Indeed, it did transfer my video from my phone right into Camtasia, no problem. The "problem" occurred when it downsized my 1920X1080 video to 1280X720 upon transfer. I contacted support and they confirmed. It appears it will stay that way, which makes it a useless app for me since I produce in the 1080 format on my computer. I would think that it would be useless for anyone doing screen casts and using a computer that's been purchased in the last 10 years.

Don't get me wrong, I like this software, but these are a couple of interesting glitches!
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davemillman

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Regarding the 720 video from Fuse, is it necessary to enlarge that to fill the screen? You could wrap a phone image around the video, and import the 720 Fuse video at 100% into your 1080 production. Something like this: 
https://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/iphone
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larry

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If I am working in a 1920X1080 timeline and import a 1280X720 video that video would pixilate if I enlarged it on the timeline back to 1920X1080. 
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davemillman

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If I am working in a 1920X1080 timeline and import a 1280X720 video that video would pixilate if I enlarged it on the timeline back to 1920X1080. 
Yes that's true. That is why I am suggesting importing the 720 Fuse video at 720 and keep it at 720 in the timeline (100%). Do not enlarge. It will only fill half the screen. Consider framing it in a phone graphic. Nothing says an image has to fill the whole screen. In the photo below Steve Jobs shows an iphone filling about 25% of his screen.