Trying to understand optimal monitor configuration and computer settings with Camtasia

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Hi,

I am running Camtasia 8.6.0 on a Windows 10 macine, 64 Bit - 16 GB RAM, Intel Core i7 - 6700K - 8MB Cache and Asus - Strix - GTX960 GPU with 4 GB RAM. Hopefully this is enough for most screen capture situation. To this computer, I have two monitors. A larger with a resolution of 3440 X 1440, and a second one with a resolution of 1920 X 1080. 

I have been recommended to make Camtasia videos with the dimensions 1280 X 720, which means that if I do the recording on the second screen, only part of the screen will be recorded.

But should I instead set the second monitor to this proportions in the Windows 10 Display settings? Or should I just leave it with the recommended settings( 1920 X 1080 ), and then just position what I would like to record within the green square?

The strange thing is that the menues and text items are a bit larger on the larger screen than on the smaller one when I drag, for example, a Google Chrome window from one monitor to the other.

Anyway, should I stick with this monitor setup when I record (and record the video on the smaller screen, and have Camtasia studio on the larger), or should I buy a smaller monitor in order to get better quality?

Are there any other computer settings that I should concider changing before recording, as I can imagine that there are tons of unneccessary processes going on in the background stealing valuble processor and gpu-power?
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Wolters

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Posted 3 years ago

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kayakman, Champion

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I'd start off by keeping it simple

capture full screen on the 1920x1080 monitor [CS doesn't do well with the larger mentioned dimensions; in fact, I believe 2024x2024 is the max]

anyway, set editing dimensions to 1920x1080, and produce to that size; this will give you maximum quality

I make almost exclusively custom productions to MP4 with controller; set video quality to 70%, H264 to high; if you use interactive content, then also set 1 second keyframes

per other posts I've seen here, the 1280x720 size is better of you are wanting to share to YouTube, and that size is a better fit for a lot of hand-held devices

perhaps others will offer their suggestions ...
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Wolters

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Thanks a lot Kayakman!

Does this mean that you have added a preset in the Production Wizzard? And if so, does this mean that, if I want to try out your configuration, that I should choose, MP4, with controller (any would do I guess), but what about size? I I have recorded a 1280X720 and look under the Size tab, it says 640X480, for both embed size and video size? However it is dimmed down, so it might be that the checked "Use editing dimensions" take precedence? And video settings, should it be set to Automatic? I guess you mean that I should set the H.264 profile to High, but what about H.264-level? Should I leave that at Auto?

Audio settings seems to be default at 128 kbps. As I am mostly doing voice over as the main "sound content", I guess that should be enough? 
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kayakman, Champion

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see if this helps ...

Walkthrough - Using Custom Production

and, you can make a preset that does all this
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Joe Morgan

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I'm going to expand  on what kayakman has posted. I prefer producing videos at 1920 x 1080.
 If want to produce your videos at 1280 x 720 I will say this.

You can use either monitor as long as you are capturing an area that is only 1280 x 720.

You could also set the 1920 x 1080 monitor to a resolution of 1280 x 720 using Windows Display Settings.
By doing that you could record your activity at full screen and this would afford you the luxury of seeing what you're doing & recording with greater ease. 

The rule of thumb for recording the screen and producing a video is pretty straight forward.
You want to "Record""Edit""and "Produce" your video using the same "Video Dimensions / Resolution"

As far as turning off other processes goes? You've got some nice computer specs. As long as you don't have unused programs open while you're  recording you should be good to go.

One thing I do recommend is setting Windows Update  to,
 " Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them "
I also use programs like After Effects and Premiere Pro. When Windows Updates were being installed  it has disrupted the editing process more than once. I'm pretty sure the same thing could happen when recording your screen.

Regards, Joe
(Edited)
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Wolters

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Thanks a lot, Joe! I think I get it! By letting the 1920 X 1080 monitor stay with its recommended resolution, on the other hand, it seems that I will be able to crop some unnecessary areas of the window that I do not need. I will certainly set the update preferences to "manual". Thanks for the tip!
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I also shoot, edit and render projects at 1280 x 720 to match the YouTube specs. The monitors are always 1920 x 1080 so I set the browser or desktop program area I'm shooting to net out to 1280 x 720 so there is no strange conversion math introduced. When a window pops out on the second screen that is recorded separately or inserted into the timeline as graphic(s). Zooms and other tools are applied where it makes sense for emphasis. The audio is always produced ahead of time and then added to the Clip Bin. These are often re-used with new screen recording for product updates.
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Wolters

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Thanks, Timbre4 for  interesting input! 

If I understand you correctly, you are recording your voice over first, using the Voice narration tool, and then add video and images to go with the speaker?
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Timbre4, Champion

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Not quite. It became clear to me early on that a good narration is clear, concise and has a good pace (not rushed to fit or awkward pauses). My steps are: a) write script, b) record (I use Sound Forge), c) edit/trim/save. Then d) play this track (with 7 second pre-roll) as I record the screen, moving at a pace that matches the narration. e) Save the screen track and f) introduce the audio into Clip Bin and place on separate track below the screen clip track. g) is adding text, arrows, graphics, zooms to finalize towards something I can render and share. Works for me. ;)
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Wolters

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Thanks again! I will try that. I went over to the Sony Sound Forge website, but found the software a bit expensive, Sound Forge Pro 11 cost around 371 € or about $400. However, a friend told me that there is a open source software called Audacity which might be enough as I am only doing voice over recordings. Do you think that Audacity will do for this kind of projects? I have also been adviced to save my audio recordings as 16-bit, 44,100 Hz wav-files before importing them into Camtasia, and I guess that even Audacity can help me with that as well?
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Timbre4, Champion

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FYI - Sound Forge is available in various levels some under $70 as Sound Forge Studio. I've been using it for 16 years and have no reason to switch. Since you you're more or less starting fresh, Audacity should do what you need it to.

Always work with 16/44.1 WAV files to keep the quality level at it's best. When you render your final project, it will be compressed at that time.

(Edited)
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kayakman, Champion

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for what it's worth, I use Audacity all the time; great tool; and, WAVs at 44,100 work great in CS
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Wolters

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Thanks a lot kayakman! This should be fun!