Viewing a window without having to zoom to it.

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  • Updated 4 years ago
This may be something everybody knows and I am just discovering it. I thought it was such a delightful discovery that I had to share it. This can be done with both Camtasia Studio and Mac.
Here's the situation, I recorded an area that was, I'd admit, way too big. The problem is that there was these little palette windows on the side that I had to constantly zoom or pan back and forth on the recording ... very frankly I can only imagine the customer getting motion sickness :-). Here's what I did:

1. I made a copy of the screen recording and placed it directly above the original recording on the time line. You have to make sure it is DIRECTLY on top so the timing matches.
2. I then selected the copy and used the crop tool to the little palette window on the side. The window had values the affected the view on the other part of the window.
3. I animated the copy so that it faded and moved in to the center screen. The customer would get the point that it is coming from the side.
4. I select the original recording and zoom into the area of attention. So now both the values that are in the little window can be seen as well as the objects they affect saving me from having to zoom or pan back and forth.

If this has already been done and known ... sorry for the redundancy ... it's just that I get excited about it.

Let me know if you have question ... or just crazy because there is a better way of doing this.
 
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Neal B

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Posted 4 years ago

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Timbre4, Champion

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That is awesome, I will incorporate that soon!
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Mary Vivit

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Very nice. Thank you for sharing it with us!
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Rick Stone

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Nice tip. Perhaps you could show us a small video using the tip?
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Neal B

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Thanks Rick ... I will try ... some time this week. 
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Fred Grover, Champion

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I would agree with Rick. That is a great tip.Thanks for sharing your tip.
(Edited)
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Neal B

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Ok ...here's the link http://www.screencast.com/t/qM9mwvWieoC

It's very crude and no sound ... Just got over the flu and my voice is not all there.

In the video it shows how (using this method) you can have more than one are spotlighted.
(Edited)
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Rick Stone

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That was really cool. Thanks so much for the video! Makes total sense now. 
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Neal B

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Your welcomed.
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Joe Morgan

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@ndbbaes

It's always great to share techniques. Even if the technique has been posted before.
That's what this forum is for.

I have used this technique myself. I just wanted to pass along a tip I like to use.
Add a border to the crop. It helps to differentiate it from the background.
It's different than the shaded callout approach. Although, I like that way as well.
See Image Below, Click to Enlarge.

Keep Posting!
Regards, Joe

(Edited)
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Neal B

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Thanks Joe ... I tried to place a drop shadow  but having issues with that. I am running through Parallel on my Mac (long story don't ask) and if something is glitchy (like the drop shadow) I just assume its the parallel issue. Tech smith doesn't recommend it.
I then tried the border but I can't remember why I took it off ... good reminder. Thanks again
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Fred Grover, Champion

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Thanks for the video and the tip(s) from you and Joe that is a great suggestion too. Have a great day/night everyone and thanks again for posting.

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