How do I record a Webex meeting as an attendee with Camtasia?

  • 2
  • Question
  • Updated 3 years ago
  • Answered
  • (Edited)
Webex recording as attendee, sound missing
Photo of Stefan

Stefan

  • 2 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
  • getting stuck

Posted 9 years ago

  • 2
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 493 Posts
  • 71 Reply Likes
Short answer: It doesn't seem possible.

More details:

My assumption is that you're joining the audio conference call via your computer and not the phone (which wouldn't be recordable with Camtasia)...
I spent a few hours of looking into options for recording WebEx meetings, and there doesn't seem to be any good method to both record and be able to hear what's going on.

Unlike applications like Skype, After Effects, etc. that also hijack the audio--this makes recording difficult--WebEx doesn't allow you to pick which of your input and output devices to use. The result is that you don't have the ability to pipe (reroute) the audio into soundflower, record it, and hear it.
Photo of mlougee

mlougee

  • 10 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Can Camtasia or Jing record an iChat screensharing session, both the video and the audio (of course it can record video, duh, so I guess recording the Mac OS's audio, in order to record both participants audio, is the question).
Photo of luke dyer

luke dyer

  • 2 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
I use soundflower + camtasia to record webinars from GoToWebinar.com. It is not a perfect solution but it gets the job done!
Photo of joe.kayak

joe.kayak

  • 2 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
I use a pair of audio jack splitters (http://www.radioshack.com/product/ind...) and one male-to-male cable (http://www.amazon.com/3-5mm-Stereo-Ma...) to tap into the audio and push the audio from the headphone jack back into the mic jack.
Photo of karlochacon

karlochacon

  • 2 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
hi joe.kayak

would you mind sending me a picture about how you connect those devices above so you are able to assist to your webex session and record it at the same time

please send to karlochacon@gmail.com

thanks a lot
Photo of karlochacon

karlochacon

  • 2 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
hi joe.kayak

would you mind sending me a picture about how you connect those devices above so you are able to assist to your webex session and record it at the same time

please send to karlochacon@gmail.com

thanks a lot
Photo of Debra Howell

Debra Howell

  • 11 Posts
  • 2 Reply Likes
I use Camtasia 7.1 to capture WebEx sessions all the time. How I accomplish this, is I use a corded desk phone connected to a Dynametric Telephone Transmit Patch to capture the audio from the conference call. (In Camtasia I have Microphone selected as the Audio source.) The other end, of course, is plugged into my PC. My corded speaker phone is off the hook and muted. To be able to hear the call, I use one of my cordless phones and mute that one as well.

A Dynametric transmit patch may be a little archaic, I don't know, but I've been doing it this way for years.
Photo of Thomas, Ken

Thomas, Ken

  • 27 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes
I tired something similar and I was never able to get it work properly. maybe i will try again. can you give some more details? so, the audio from the conference call is plugged into your microphone jack, via that splitter? are there any other settings you have to adjust anywhere?
Photo of Ram

Ram

  • 2 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
I am trying to record a web-ex session using Camtasia and when I interact with the host they are not able to hear me. If I disconnect the recording it is fine. My operating system is MS Windows 7 and I am using Camtasia-7. Your inputs valuable to me. Thanks in advance

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Recording WEB-EX the Host not able to hear me.
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
Hi Ram,

Hopefully the posts above will shed some light on your problem.

We also have a blog post with some general information on recording webinars:
http://blogs.techsmith.com/tips-how-t...

I'd specifically check out the link to the Forge episode on that page (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJnWMT...).
Photo of Thomas, Ken

Thomas, Ken

  • 27 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes
I truly loathe to have to watch a video on how to do something. There should be some detailed steps written down. no one wants to have to keep watching a video over and over, so they can jot down notes on how to do it. videos are great --- if and only if they are accompanied by detailed good documentation. any chance you guys at techsmith could write down how to do this? with details on the settings, what they do, and how to properly record a webinar to cpature both the leaders voice, all participants voices and also record the video of the webinar? without any echoes. there are so many posts about this and no definitive solid answers anywhere
Photo of David

David

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
Agree. I'm a new user with no written documentation. How-to videos are great for 2 or 3 simple steps. But the same steps, written down, specific for your app (Camtasia v8, in my case), would be more helpful and very much appreciated!
Photo of Jashua Thompson

Jashua Thompson

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
You may try rhubcom.com web conferencing server. It provdes recording functionality wherein it records both screen and voice.
Photo of Bruce Morehouse

Bruce Morehouse

  • 73 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
I too was unable to get it to record the other side's audio.  All the audio it recorded where my voice and my system sounds.  No sound came from the Webex show (I use USB headphones, and USB doesn't like to share)

WORK AROUND:
Here's how I was able to do it, and it's definitely sub-optimal, and it requires that the Webex record the meeting, plus a fair chunk of time.

  1. Have the Webex session recorded (easier if you're the host!)
  2. Download the recording (in a proprietary .arf format) (cannot convert when on their server)
  3. You also need to download their "Network Recording Player" (but once only)
  4. Open your download in the Cisco Webex "Network Recording Player"
  5. Hit play
  6. Then pause or stop
  7. Select menu File --> Convert Format --> WMV
    I'd prefer MP4, but your Webex license must be "Validated", which even workers at Webex tech support cannot do).  I don't believe that Cisco is providing the mp4 converter any more, and the "validating..." message is actually misleading. 

    The time to convert to .mov is longer than the actual recording.
    a 30 minute recording is 71MB .arf, and 106MB .mov.
  8. Drag the converted .mov file into the media bin of Camtasia
  9. Now you may start your real work.
I also tried playing around with my phone headphones plugged directly into the speaker jack on my computer.  That made no difference.  It seems like you need to conflate the input and output as Debra Howell outlined above.  If/when I figure that out I'll post it.  It seems like this shouldn't be so difficult.
(Edited)
Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 661 Posts
  • 233 Reply Likes
There's an easy way to do this that I've been using successfully for years. This is the Mac path, similar tools are available on Windoze.

The trick is to record the video and audio separately. You will need the following:
Steps:
  1. To record the Video portion of the webcast or conference call, use Camtasia as usual. Select any portion of the screen, or the full screen. Do not record audio. 
  2. This is crucial: DO NOT connect to the Audio portion of the webcast via computer. Instead, use Skype to call the telephone dial in number.
  3. Use Skype Call Recorder to record the Skype call to get the audio. It records every Skype call by default, so you really don't have to do anything!
  4. Combine the resulting audio and video on the Camtasia timeline.
This may sound tricky, but I do it all the time. It works great.
Photo of Bruce Morehouse

Bruce Morehouse

  • 73 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
I like it!  Hacky but straight forward--and it doesn't require any extra hardware.

Taking the time and effort to share benefits us all.  Thank you Dave.
Photo of susan

susan

  • 2 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
If you want to record a WebEx meeting as an Attendee, ask the Host to grant you permission.  The Host can give individual Attendees the ability to record.  Then you'll have the WebEx recorder controls and will be able to  record the meeting, using the WebEx recorder. It's not cool to steal someone's content, by recording them without their knowledge -  so just ask.  
Photo of susan

susan

  • 2 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
To record someone's WebEx meeting as an attendee, first, ask the meeting host's permission to record their content.  The Host in a WebEx meeting can activate your recording controls, allowing you to record the session and save it on your own computer, using the WebEx recorder.
Photo of susannemistric

susannemistric

  • 111 Posts
  • 86 Reply Likes
Be sure you have the permission of all involved. As others have stated, this is an ethical slippery slope at the very least.
Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 661 Posts
  • 233 Reply Likes
While asking permission is of course the courteous thing to do, you should know that anything you publish on the internet, even "private" content like email and live WebEx webinars, is recorded in so many places that "privacy" is irrelevant. Our antiquated concept of content privacy, created when there was a real cost and erectable barriers to copying paper documents, no longer has meaning. If you don't want it stored, don't publish or distribute it (and consider not recording it at all).
(Edited)
Photo of Bruce Morehouse

Bruce Morehouse

  • 73 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Good comments all about civility, legality, and just doing the right thing.  We need more of that!

These are training videos I do remotely then tighten up/annotate in Camtasia.  I ran through a test that davemillman suggested (thank you Dave) recording Audio from Skype. I bought MP3 Skype Recorder for 7 euros (I was concerned about freeware/malware for free).  It is a dead simple interface, and the sound is very good.

My painful step by steps that (seemed?) to work in a dry run are copied below

Start - 30 minutes
  1. Start classroom applications
    Position tiled on right monitor
  2. Quit all unnecessary applications
  3. Turn off outside notifications
    Email notifications off
    Silence cell phone (but leave notifications on)
       plug cell phone in if low battery
    Silence office phone
    Set "Do Not Disturb" in Lync
    Put note on outside of door "Recording in progress-do not disturb"
    Close door
  4. Set large cursor for display
    From Control panel, set Mouse Properties, "Pointers" to "Windows Aero (extra large) (system scheme)" to get a big mouse for users to see
  5. Ensure monitor color scheme is 32bit
    (mouse actions not captured in Camtasia with 16bit display)
  6. Start MS Outlook in case student is lost and emailing
    Tile on left monitor
  7. Start MS Word for class notes
    Display on left monitor
    Classroom notes template already saved to correct directory
  8. Setup Camtasia on right monitor, and pause
    Settings are to Record video, but no audio
    Record in .trec (so I can make the cursor larger)
    Set Camtasia recording bar at bottom/right of left monitor
  9. Start mouse annotation software SpotOnTheMouse
    Left,Middle,Right mouse annotation on
    Ctrl/Shift/Alt annotation on
    Keyboard annotation on
    All other annotation off
  10. Sign into Skype
    Tile on left monitor
    Ensure sufficient funds to record whole class
    (2.3 cents/minute, plus 5 cent connection charge, or less than  $1.50/hour)
    Configure to use my headphone for both playback and recording
  11. Start MP3 Skype Recorder
    Pause
    Position bottom left, left monitor
  12. Start Firefox for ad hoc web queries and to host Webex
    Tile on left monitor
    Navigate to Google

    Physical objects on hand

  13. Classroom attendees names & companies cheat sheet
  14. Classroom script
  15. This script
  16. Accelerator key cheat sheet for classroom applications
  17. Accelerator key cheat sheet for SpotOnTheMouse, Skype recording, Camtasia
  18. Paper, pencil, markers
  19. Glass water at hand
Start - 10 minutes
  1. Empty bladder
  2. Start Webex
    but don't start sharing right monitor yet
  3. Detach Webex Chat window
    Tile top rightmost position on left monitor
  4. Detach attendees window
    Position to left of chat Webex Chat window
  5. Phone into meeting using Skype
Start - 0 minutes
  1. Start Webex sharing right monitor
  2. Brief technical Intro
  3. Let attendees know that I'll be recording
  4. Start Skype recording
  5. Inform class recording is starting
  6. Start recording Camtasia
  7. Say recording "now" and a click
    (so it is easier to sync sound and video tracks, using sound and the annotated click)
  8. Run class. . .Finish class
  9. Stop Skype recording
  10. Stop Webex
  11. Stop Camtasia
  12. Save recording to correct classroom directory
  13. Drag soundtrack into project
  14. Save again
  15. Sync sound via the "now" from step 5.
  16. Edit class recording.
(Edited)
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5652 Posts
  • 2691 Reply Likes
Nice list and very kind of you to share!

As for the skype and ensuring sufficient funds, that's certainly one way to fly. Hopefully you are aware that Skype also offers a yearly fee that allows unlimited calling. I've opted for that for several years now. Although, I don't believe it covers international calls. Or maybe the plan I opted for doesn't.

Anyway, thought I'd mention it as you may find it to be more cost effective than paying by the minute.

Cheers... Rick :)
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5652 Posts
  • 2691 Reply Likes
Oh, and I'm also a bit curious about the computer performance with all that running. Notice any delays or other hickeys?

Thanks... Rick :)
Photo of davemillman

davemillman

  • 617 Posts
  • 208 Reply Likes
Rick,

A couple of generations ago, it was necessary to record video on one PC and audio on another. These days, 2013 MacBook Pro Retina, it all runs on one laptop and never drops a frame. Your Windoze mileage may vary.
(Edited)
Photo of Bruce Morehouse

Bruce Morehouse

  • 73 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Oh Dave, that's a low blow!  ;-)
Unfortunately, my company does not endorse OSX!
So yes, my mileage suffers considerably
Photo of Bruce Morehouse

Bruce Morehouse

  • 73 Posts
  • 25 Reply Likes
Rick,

With Webex, the response is very snappy.
I was watching on my other machine (a 6 year old Mac), and there was just the tiniest lag.
I have 16GB RAM.  Windows7 64bit. 3GHz i7-3540M CPU (as if I knew what that means).
I'm on a pokey DSL with 0.70 Mbps upload limit,
Probably Webex does wicked signal compression to get the response it does.

Cheers,
Bruce
Photo of Jack Fruh

Jack Fruh, Champion

  • 575 Posts
  • 197 Reply Likes
I haven't tried recording a webex but it makes me wonder if one of the following tools would simplify what many have written above:

Mac: Loopback by Rogue Amoeba https://www.rogueamoeba.com/loopback/
Windows: VB Audio's Voicemeeter: http://vb-audio.pagesperso-orange.fr/Voicemeeter/index.htm

Both of these tools create a virtual microphone that you can select from camtasia, You choose what gets routed into the virtual microphone in either loopback or Voicemeeter.