What is your approach for making videos?

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I have made a number of training videos, primarily technical and clinical application training videos for my service group. For the most part, the source material has been PowerPoint presentations. I am using Presonus Studio One for recording audio, because it gives me better flexibility and control over the audio quality. The way I approach my projects is to record each slide and accompanying audio separately, and then stitching them together after all is complete. Therefore, a presentation that has like 40 individual slides will also have 40 individual audio clips. The reasoning for this is that if I have to make an edit of an individual slide, it's much easier to manage. I'm curious to know how others approach their projects. Am I making too much work for myself? Do any of you have a better approach?
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bill.ryan

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Posted 2 years ago

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Rick Stone

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Hi there

For me, I take different approaches depending on the type of video I want to create. For example, if I'm creating a simple segment to walk someone through a process, perhaps to answer a forum question, I'll just launch the recorder and off I go. Very casual.

But if I'm creating content for something more permanent or that will be part of a larger class, the approach I'll take will generally take one of two forms, depending on what I'm hoping to convey.

In the first example, perhaps it is conceptual. For those, I'll script out what I want to convey, record the audio until I'm pleased with it, then plop the audio track into Camtasia and add visuals as needed, carefully matching and animating them to match the audio.

In the second example, perhaps it is procedural. So for those, I may script what I want to convey, then record both the audio as well as visual operations performing the actions and narrating as I go.

I'm sure others will operate differently, depending on what seems to "work" for them.

I'm a bit of a maverick in choosing workflows that appeal to me and not simply adopting an arbitrary approach based on some herd mentality. You know, I heard it was best, so now I'm following the herd!

I tend to enjoy turning things on their head if possible. I find that this approach often facilitates discovery.

Hopefully I've provided something marginally helpful here.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Here's Johnny

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Confucius say.
Never appoint yourself a maverick. Just kidding around here.lol
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erik.groenhaug

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Making training videos are just one of several tasks we're doing in my team, so time used per minute of video produced is important. Usually we'll be using powerpoint and product demoes. Powerpoint will be our tool both for the first idea drafts as well as for the final script ans slides. We record using presenter mode on one screen, recording the slides from the second screen, using the notes area in powerpoint for the script, adding [C] for when to click for next and .. dots for short pauses ( one dot approx half a second). For product demos we usually just list the steps shown, and then record demo and comments in one go. Often this will be ok without much post- production tweaking. If not, we edit the demo, make a script based on the original comments, using time codes for each starting point. Voice-over Is then added.
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erik.groenhaug

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Btw: We only use good quality condenser microphones. Getting rid of headset mics did much to improve the overall quality of our videos.
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Joe Morgan

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Well bill.ryan,
your approach sounds pretty solid me. I think the time your investing is probably just about right for a quality production.

What I like about?
You can easily edit one or more or your "Slides & Narration". It's easy to update slides and keep your training videos current with minimal effort down the road.

The best way to keep your project and assets together is to save the project as a zipped project.



That way all the project assets "Slides,Audio,Video, etc." will be bundled together in one easy to manage zipped folder and won't get accidentally deleted or lost.


I might be able to offer you some suggestions. Without actually seeing your work, It's difficult to form an opinion.

Regards,Joe 
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bill.ryan

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Thanks all for your responses (except Here's Johnny - I don't know what's up with that). My approach is somewhere between Erik's and Rick's - not so structured like Erik, but I also will "wing it" with smaller 5-minute or so quick instructional things.  It seems like I'm more less on the right way. I am using the Yeti Blue condenser microphone with Presonus Studio One software (they were packaged together). The audio is now like 1000% better. 

Overall I am quite happy with Camtasia. The quality of my projects is getting better with every one that I do.

Question for Joe: I share projects between my work and home computers, and synchronize the content by way of my Synology NAS. If I zip the projects, will I then have the content duplicated in two places on both computers? The more I work with these training videos, the more I get worried about storage...
(Edited)
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erik.groenhaug

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Letting one project travel between computers: establish a work\project folder on each. Use zipped projects, but make sure that you always-after the first session- start by loading the zip, and end by making a new zip. Clean up the workspace after each move ( only the zipped file should remain).
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Joe Morgan

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Hey Bill,
That's the long and short of it.What erik.groenhaug posted.

The concept of the zipped project is to keep everything together under one roof.
When your assets are spread across various folders.Zipping the project takes the headache out of moving to another computer in most cases.
Then, as erik pointed out.When you've completed editing and ready to move to the other computer.Re-zip the project as an updated project. Work with the new project.

I'm not familiar with Synology NAS. How files are handled through that service may require a different approach.

A more common approach would be to copy the zipped project  to a flash-drive and take it home with you. It's usually faster than sharing video files over the internet.

Regards,Joe