What questions do you have about zooming and scaling in Camtasia Studio or Camtasia for Mac?

  • 5
  • Question
  • Updated 3 years ago
After watching the video "Zooming: the often misunderstood half-holy grail of screencasting quality" post any questions or comments here about:

  • how zooming/scaling works in Camtasia or video in general?

  • needing clarification about something in the video

  • what other information you'd like on the topic

Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 493 Posts
  • 71 Reply Likes

Posted 7 years ago

  • 5
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 493 Posts
  • 71 Reply Likes
There are two videos that talk more about the how-tos of using "zooms".

Camtasia Studio: 06: Apply SmartFocus to Zoom and Pan
Camtasia for Mac: 6: Increase viewer understanding: Zoom, Pan, Bam
Photo of Christian Garrelts

Christian Garrelts

  • 4 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes
Hi Conan
What a perfect timing
Christian from http://www.iMarketing.dk here :-)

I was just about to test this myself, and will do anyway as I have set myself up to it :-)

Question:

What is giving me the best quality in the end:
Working in a active window 720 px wide and exporting the video @ 100%
Or
Working in a window 1440 px wide and exporting the video @ 50%?
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 493 Posts
  • 71 Reply Likes
Hi Christian,

Excellent question. Just to be clear, when you say "working in a window" do you mean "recording" or "editing" a window of that size?

Given that Camtasia usually exports at the size you edit at, I'll assume you're talking about recording.

If you don't do any zooming, then exporting at 100% will give you the best quality. That often works best if your content is small enough to fit in a recording area of that size.

However, if you're content/app/whatever is larger, then you'll most likely need to record a larger area (e.g. the full screen), edit smaller, and use zooms/scaling animations to show details when important.

Does that answer your question enough?

Conan.
Photo of norausky

norausky

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Hi.  I'm totally confused.  When I record, Camtasia is recording at whatever percentage the program opened up with, right? Which seems to be set to 65% automatically for Mac.  I don't see any tutorial that showed me to record at a certain percentage. Then when I am editing, I notice Camtasia automatically has my screen set to 65%.

I create my title page and go on editing what I see with the canvas.  I enlarged the "white part" of the title page to be the full size of the canvas as it showed on the tutorial page.  Then, when I go to share/export the video to my desktop and then embed on my website, does Camtasia automatically export at 100%?  I'm confused sorry.  I haven't seen any video tutorial that is explaining this.  I get that I may add zooms to the video when I'm editing it, but that doesn't mean the entire video is changed to the lower percentage of the zoom, etc. 

Help.
Photo of norausky

norausky

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
By the way, I'm not a "tech" person.  Please talk in % rather than resolution pixels.  I have no clue how to figure that out based on what I'm seeing unless you have a video tutorial on it.  I only see percentages expressed in the software, so that is what I understand. 
Photo of Josh Holnagel

Josh Holnagel, Employee

  • 426 Posts
  • 80 Reply Likes
I think this tutorial may help you: http://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-camtasia-mac-editing-dimensions-basics.html

It explains what happens in Camtasia for Mac after recording, when a canvas size is set. Just to confirm, the recording is always done at 100%. It's during the editing process that your recording may be displayed at a lower (or higher) percentage. The tutorial also shows how to edit the precise pixel dimensions of the video you are creating. 

Let us know if you have any other questions!

 
Photo of norausky

norausky

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
OK thanks for the quick reply.  I will give it a shot. 

Also, I watched video #6, 3 times.  I practiced.  I get that I click on transitions > zoom in > drag to timeline to the position of the header where I think I want to zoom.  But, I cannot figure out how to zoom in more than just a little bit.  The video shows a zoom going to the corner of the screen on the canvas.  For the life of me, I could never get this to happen.  Is there another video with more details I could watch.  I used Final Cut Pro and totally understand how to edit video in that.  But, Camtasia seems more difficult to figure out so far and I'm a bit frustrated.  Thanks for the help.
Photo of Josh Holnagel

Josh Holnagel, Employee

  • 426 Posts
  • 80 Reply Likes
When you apply a "zoom-in" animation, it scales the video to 100%. In your case, it sounds like zooming to 100% only scales the video up just a tiny bit. If you'd like to zoom in closer, you can do that in two ways:

1. You could just grab the corner handle of your recording (on the canvas) and drag it out to make the recording larger. 

2. You could open the properties panel, and manually set the scale to something higher than 100%. 
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 493 Posts
  • 71 Reply Likes
Hi!

Not sure if it was a typo, but you said that you clicked on "transitions" and used the zoom in there. You should be using the one in "Animations." I totally agree that the difference between the two can be confusing; it's subtle, but important. If you're interested in understanding what the "transitions" one is, I'd love to expand on that, but let's just stay with what you're trying to accomplish first.

Also, perhaps 6:05 in the video you watched is what's most relevant. Here's a text summary:
  1. Go to the "Animations" tab and drag the "Zoom in" animation to your timeline (where you want the zoom in to be).
  2. With the playhead AFTER the animation you just added, go to the canvas and drag your video so it show the area of your video you what displayed.
Does that clear things up?


Conan.
Photo of norausky

norausky

  • 7 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Hi Conan,

Yes, you are correct.  I had a typo there.  Thank you so much for clarifying and writing the steps out a bit. I tried it exactly as you suggested and it worked perfectly!  Thank you. 

Also, thanks for being so fast with responses!
Cheers
Photo of Phuoc Nguyen

Phuoc Nguyen

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Hi,
Thanks so much for the Video....
Photo of Christian Garrelts

Christian Garrelts

  • 4 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes
Hi Conan.
Thank you.
Photo of VinceA

VinceA

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Hi Conan,
Helpful video, thanks! I always struggle with screen resolution when recording. I always hear the TechSmith team say to "record full screen" but I don't understand the relationship between full screen recordings and screen resolution I guess.

Is it better to record full screen at 1024x768 or should I keep my current resolution of 1680x1050 and record full screen? We create end user training videos and post them in our SaaS application and produce them at 640x480.

I'm good with content but not as strong with the editing tools :-)

Thanks for any insight
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
Excellent question and one that's fairly common.

Here's a general set of steps to determine what to record at. Choose the first one that works well for you:

  1. Record at the same size as you'll be producing at.

  2. If whatever you're recording doesn't look good/normal at that size, then try recording at 1.5-2 times the size you'll be producing at. (e.g. if you'll share at 640x480, then record at 960x720 or 1280x960). Try to keep the same aspect ratio. Use animations to zoom in on details and back out to show context.

  3. Record at whatever resolution you can.



Of course, the more complete answer is, "it depends on the content you're recording."
If you're recording a PowerPoint, or something else that looks pretty much the same at any resolution, then record at the size you'll be sharing at.
If you're recording something that needs to be bigger, then still try to record at the same aspect ratio you'll be sharing at.

Recording full screen, especially with applications, ensures that no dialog boxes, menus, etc. will appear partially outside of the recording area.

Does that help?
Photo of VinceA

VinceA

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
I think it does provide some good ideas. Our training videos are really just showing users how to accomplish tasks within our SaaS application.

I'm going to test number 2 today at twice the production resolution and see how it goes. Appreciate the time and insight. Thank-you
Photo of VinceA

VinceA

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Oh, one more question please. When you say "record at 1.5-2 times..." do you mean set the recording size via the "custom" drop-down and enter 960x720 or do you mean set my screen resolution to 960x720 and then record full screen? Thanks again
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
Setting the screen resolution to that size--or as close to it as possible--then recording full screen is usually a good plan. For example, we generally share at 800x450 (for our website & the tutorial viewer) but record at 1440x900 (which is slightly off the aspect ratio), since OS X won't let us set the resolution to 1440x810.
Photo of VinceA

VinceA

  • 4 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thank you sir! Will attempt same today.
Photo of Mark Chadwick

Mark Chadwick

  • 4 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Hi Conan,

I just went through your video tutorial about a dozen times and I've pored over all the comments. I think I finally understand. This could be a eureka moment for me. So let me go through my plan and maybe you can critique my approach.

It is common for me to record a PowerPoint presentation (not using the special I/F in Camtasia because I use 64-bit). I want to produce this video for YouTube HD 720p. My maximum screen is 1920 X 1080. Here is my plan:

1) Create a PowerPoint template that is 20 X 11.25. (This is the size of my screen and a 16:9 aspect ratio.)
2) Temporarily change the resolution of my screen to 1280 X 720.
3) Run a PowerPoint “slideshow” (thereby full screen) and record full screen.
4) Edit and produce at 1280 X 720.

I’m thinking that this will give me the best resolution possible for my PowerPoint presentation. Is this correct?
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
Mark,

This sounds good to me.

The best-case scenario is to create, record, edit, produce/share, and view all at exactly the same dimensions.
Photo of Keith Ferguson

Keith Ferguson

  • 37 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
I shouldn't say i disagree with your recommendation as it is valid depending on the situation.
We struggle with capturing at full screen and produce at smaller resolution. This can make all you video look poor and only your zoom look good. As you pointed out when you zoom the quality is affect. the computer needs to interpret the pixels. Also you make be changing the aspect ratio, 16:9 to 4:3, of the video and that will really reduce the quality of your video.

we use 2 techniques

opt 1. We change the resolution of the monitor to be close as possible to the target for viewing and capture full screen. I realize this can not always be down. Compromised are need. turn of the screen scaling so the image is not stretched to fill the screen

opt. 2 lock the record to the application you are capturing the video of. changing the size in the record functionality will resize your application. then you do not have to change you screen resolution. If the application has pop up windows or drop down menus they may extend past the recording window size. if this is the case capture the video full screen with opt 1.

added note. we capture almost everything at 1280x1024 and produce at 1024x768. i know this changes proportions slightly but like i said there are always compromises. this still produces a very high quality recording and fits a lot of formats other than small mobile devices
Photo of Josh Holnagel

Josh Holnagel, Employee

  • 427 Posts
  • 80 Reply Likes
Keith,

Thanks for your reply.

The key to what Conan explains is that we capture at full screen (well, kinda - more on that in a minute) and then produce videos with smaller resolutions - BUT (and it's a big one) we scale the videos when editing to exactly 100% as often as common sense allows. This means that we are almost always focused in on smaller areas of the screen, following the mouse, showing menus, etc.

Now, this obviously is not possible when you are showing full-screen PowerPoint presentations and other instances when seeing the whole picture at all times is necessary - but that's the trade off. If you need to show something full screen, but expect users to be able to view it on phones or small tablets, they might have difficulty seeing everything clearly.

Lastly, about what size we capture at: Since our monitors are not 16:9, we actually size our windows so that they are vertically centered and in the 16:9 ratio. Then we capture full screen, but we never have to show the small areas of desktop at the top and bottom. Like this:



Thanks for the engagement Your options will indeed help with quality in most cases.

-Josh
Photo of Keith Ferguson

Keith Ferguson

  • 37 Posts
  • 6 Reply Likes
Josh
Valid comments. i changed my posting to better represent what i was trying to says and the challenges we have run into.
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 493 Posts
  • 71 Reply Likes
Keith,

Thanks for sharing the techniques you use. I encourage anyone else reading this topic to look over them.

Also, if you're recording presentations (PowerPoint/Keynote), take a look at Mark's comments as well.
Photo of Marsha McFalls

Marsha McFalls

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
I recorded a 1280 x 720 portion of my screen. I am also editing and producing a 1280 x 720 video. I am having difficulty with the zoom feature. I tried the blank animation and the Scale to 100% (which appears to do nothing). With the blank animation I scale the screen to about 180% to get the area that I need to zoom in on. The problem is, it is extremely blurry. Should I be recording and producing at a different size to get better results? Also, in the tutorial, it showed to select Actual Pixels after applying a zoom animation to get clearer results, but again, mine does nothing. I'm not really sure what that feature is. It doesn't seem to be this complicated applying this using the Windows Version??? Thanks!
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
If you're editing at the same dimensions that you recorded at (e.g. 1280x720, in your case), then you're already at 100% scale (aka. Actual Pixel), so applying those won't do anything.

If you scale/zoom in or out, then it will be fuzzier, since the computer will need to calculate a close estimation at a different size.

To your question about recording at a different size, it depends on if you need to. How/where will your viewers see your video? 720p & 1080p are great for full-screen movies, but generally not the best for sharing over the web.

The big reason you'd need to apply zooms/scales is if you need to share at a smaller size than you recorded at and want to show clear details of some parts of your recording.

If 1280x720 works great for you to share, then you don't really need to zoom in at all. Instead, if you want to focus where your viewers should look, I'd use callouts (e.g. arrows, circles, boxes, etc.).

Does that answer your question? What did I miss?

Conan.
Photo of Patti Murphy

Patti Murphy

  • 25 Posts
  • 5 Reply Likes
Hi there,

Perhaps you can help me with my conundrum. We typically record and share at 1280x720. No problems there.

But our company wants to outsource a key video to a consulting firm who wants clips captured at 1920x1080.

Can I use the 1080p clips in an editing dimension of 1280x720p without a loss in quality (considering the aspect ratio is 16:9 for both)? I'd like to avoid having to capture the same things at two different settings, ya know?

Thanks.

Patti
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
Hi Patti,

As far as loss of quality, it depends on what the content is. If it's camera video (e.g. interviews, tour of a facility, etc.), you're probably just fine.

However, if the content is screen video, especially with text, you'll see degradation when moving from 1080p down to 720p. At that point, it seems you have 3 choices:
1) Leave it as is
2) Zoom in to the parts where the text/details should be clear
3) Convince them to take 720p

Does that help?

Conan.
Photo of Patti Murphy

Patti Murphy

  • 25 Posts
  • 5 Reply Likes
Thanks so much, Conan. This gives me the ammo to ask for Option 3. I have to meet my timelines too. :)

I appreciate your prompt response.
Photo of Patti Murphy

Patti Murphy

  • 25 Posts
  • 5 Reply Likes
One more question. If I "leave it as is" (1080p) what are my output choices? We want to be able to view it on all devices, so we prefer mp4, which isn't an output option for videos larger than 720p.

I would have to do custom production settings, right? I understand that there are limitations with the HTML5 player and iPhones....
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
If you produce as "Custom" you should be able to set that at 1920x1080, while still creating an MP4.

Your mention of "all devices" and iPhones, makes me a bit curious. Even with the retina displays, the phones have a max height of 640 pixels, so there will be resizing on the device--although Apple's mobile products usually do an amazing job at that. Also, 1080p videos are going to be 2-4 times the file size of the equivalent 720p video. Depending on your delivery method, that might or might not be an issue.

Just some more fun stuff to think about.

And, yes, iPhones don't natively support the Flash/HTML5 player Camtasia creates. However, there is a "Smart Player" app that can open and play the videos--although, this is mostly only an issue if you have interactivity, table of contents, quizes, etc.
Photo of Patti Murphy

Patti Murphy

  • 25 Posts
  • 5 Reply Likes
OK. Thanks again. I was distracted by the list of files produced with custom production settings. So, I just pluck the MP4 out of the list and use that file, right? Maybe that's the way to go--custom production settings for an MP4 at 1080p (editing dimensions).

I'll see how much the file size affects our hosting services and ask forgiveness if the bill is substantially higher. If my manager freaks out, I'll just blame the marketing department. :) Or I'll ask them to consider 720p.
Photo of MB Sklar

MB Sklar

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Hi,

I've looked at all the tutorials and read through many support articles, but still don't understand how to choose a good resolution for my tutorial videos. I have read that recording, editing and producing should be done at the same resolution; however, zooming into features is an important element in my videos, and Camtasia documentation states that zooming is best done when editing in a resolution smaller than your recording dimensions.

How does one reconcile these seemingly contradictory statements?

Thank you in advance...

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Camtasia recording/producing resolution for zooming.
Photo of Dave O'Rourke

Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

  • 1443 Posts
  • 411 Reply Likes
In answer to your question... these are 2 different approaches for preserving the quality of your recording through your editing process.

The first approach is simple... record, edit, and produce all at the same dimensions. This approach is easy to understand, and I recommend this for beginners. But it's not the only way to achieve a good result.

The second approach is a little more advanced... record at full screen, edit and produce at a smaller size, but zoom in when you want visual quality to improve, and zoom back out when you want to show context.

Let's take an example to help explain this second approach... let's say I record at 1280x720. When I drop it on the timeline, I choose 640x360 as the editing dimensions, because I've decided I want to publish the final video on my website at that size. What I now see in the preview window is the original video, shrunk down by half (50% of the original) in width and height, which makes the text difficult to read. This is the quality loss from scaling. I can counter this by zooming in. As I'm editing, I decide that I want to zoom in on a portion of the video, which makes the text bigger, and easier to read. So I switch to the Zoom-n-Pan tab, position my play head to where I want the zoom, and and I click on the 1:1 button (assuming CS 8 here). This creates an animation on the timeline, and the text in the preview window now looks the same size as in the original video. I can repeat this process farther down the timeline to zoom back out. Once I'm satisfied with the way it looks in the preview window, I can produce the video. I almost always produce at the same dimensions as my canvas, which gives my a 640x360 video. The text in my resulting video will be small and difficult to read, except for the parts where I've zoomed in. But these zoom animations add visual interest, and help to engage my viewers, so I'm happy with the result.

You'll see this second approach used in many of the videos our instructional designers create. It's a common approach, because often you want (or need) to record a large area (e.g. the whole screen), but then you need a final video that is much smaller, to be embedded on a blog, or website, or to play on a mobile phone, etc.

Anyways, I hope this helps.
Photo of MB Sklar

MB Sklar

  • 3 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thank you Dave. Your response is actually one of the clearest I've read when addressing this question. I understand that Techsmith promotes record/edit/produce at same res because it's best for beginners, but the second option should also be better promoted for the more advanced user. When I searched your materials and forums, I did not find as clear an explanation as yours.

Thank you for your help ~

Mary Beth
Photo of TinasKeep

TinasKeep

  • 3 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
I agree with Mary Beth, I went through a lot of videos and explanations not feeling clear until I read Dave's explanation. I finally see the light bulb.
Photo of Jim Gilliam

Jim Gilliam

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
I tested the Zoom/Pan option. The zoom part works, but after I've finished the zoom, how do I easily return the screen to its original size before I created the zoom? Seems like even returning the percentage back to the percentage it was before doesn't work.

Using the "Return to full scale" icon button only scales items to fit the screen. For example, I have a text callout at 26pt and an image on the timeline. When I zoom to show the image better and then scale back out, the text is still larger than how I originally created it.

There's not a "return to original state" type option when using the Zoom-Pan option?

Thanks,

Jim
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
Hi Jim,

Zoom-n-Pan was made to work with full-canvas video, which was pretty much all you could do in Camtasia Studio 7 and before. However, 8 is a lot more flexible, allowing you place and size media wherever you want, as well as animate nearly everything via Visual Properties.

The problem is that now Zoom-n-Pan doesn't always behave properly in situations like the one you've shown. I'll pass your example on to the design and development team, and hopefully it will improve in the future.

To get around what you're seeing, there a couple of workarounds. The one I would try is to group those two items on the timeline, then use Visual Properties to create your zooms and pans (http://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-cam...).

Since you'll be making two zooms (in first, then back out), I would add the zoom-out animation first--it won't do anything initially--then add the zoom-in animation before it. That probably doesn't make sense yet, but likely will once you've done it once.

Let me know if this does/doesn't work for you.

Conan.
Photo of Jim Gilliam

Jim Gilliam

  • 5 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thanks, Conan. Adding the zoom-out first does help the situation if you're careful. For example, I have a title callout that animates-in. After the animation completes, however, if I add a zoom/pan onto another object, it totally messes up the animated title position. I guess it's not good to add a zoom in effect to another part of the screen while an animated callout is also there. So I've just started fading out the title callout and going ahead with the zoom effect.
Photo of sandyhovatter

sandyhovatter

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
I'm pulling a video recorded outside into Camtasia, adding voice-over to explain what's happening to the video and then some still images before and after the video. The video is large and clear before I bring it into Camtasia and then produce it, but smaller and fuzzier after production. Thoughts on how to improve this?
Thanks, Sandy
Photo of Josh Holnagel

Josh Holnagel, Employee

  • 427 Posts
  • 80 Reply Likes
Hi Sandy,

Thanks for posting. Do you know what the dimensions of the original video are?

If you don't want the video to get smaller, you'll want to set your editing dimensions in Camtasia to match those of your original video. I'm not sure if you're on a Mac or a PC, but you can typically get the dimensions of a video file by viewing the file details.

If you get the dimensions to match and you're still seeing some quality loss after production, you might try bumping up the video quality slider a bit in the production settings.

Does this help?
-Josh
Photo of bbrowne

bbrowne

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
Does it make a big difference if I record on my monitor (using a docking station for my laptop), vs my laptop directly, if I plan to zoom and pan?
The monitor resolution is 1920x1080, which is larger than the laptop screen resolution. Does that give me more zoom options when editing?
Thanks!
Photo of David Patton

David Patton, Employee

  • 90 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
Yes, having a larger monitor does give you better screen resolution when editing. However, pay close attention to your canvas size as well. More info here: http://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-camtasia-mac-canvas-dimensions-prior.html

Best,
David
Photo of totheoutsidersclan

totheoutsidersclan

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
We are using CS 8. We make tutorials for YouTube. I'll list my concerns below:

My monitor's resolution is set to 1920x1080, but this is what I do BEFORE recording the screen. 

1) set the monitor @ 1280x720 (recommended for YouTube). 
2) record the video @ 1280x720
3) edit the video @ 1280x720
4) produce and share with YouTube @ 1280x720

Let me add, I don't zoom at all, period. I just add the text where I know it should go, as I see zooming will mess things up if you're a newbie like myself using this program.  

Does the Shrink to fit option in the editor mess with settings? I don't touch those at all.

When I load my clip from the clipbin, I simply just play the video and pause when call outs are needed and that's it. Is it a call out [text] issue maybe? No zooming in and out or any of the flashy stuff. I just want a clear tutorial with non-fuzzy text.

I've even went in and adjusted the scale to 100%, and followed the tutorial here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AQi2Z8pZv8
When I am DONE with the edit and getting ready to produce, here is the issue. I think it has to do with Call Outs. Maybe? Or color? Not too certain on this yet. 

Results:

1) video (screen) itself turns out beautiful
2) call outs (circles and squares and arrows) all are a bit fuzzy looking
3) call outs text looks fuzzy


Would it just be best to record only with CS 8 and just use Windows Movie Maker for the editing, because I know with that the fonts aren't fuzzy.


 
(Edited)
Photo of Nam

Nam

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
Hi,

I am recording a webcam and screen at the same time. When I edit I usually scale and move those two items on canvas i.e. in certain parts I make webcam stream as full screen and vice versa.

This worked well for me for some time however now I have two issues
- sometimes the webcam stream is not scalable, as if its size has been locked.
- also sometimes scaling works as zooming i.e. when i make the frame smaller it zooms instead of scaling down.

Could you help me find what I am doing wrong please?

Im using CS 8.

Thanks!
(Edited)
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 69 Reply Likes
Hi Nam,

Are you using Zoom-n-Pan or Animations to scale?

Zoom-n-Pan scales everything together, while scaling with animations (in the Visual Properties tab) gives you more accurate control over each element.

Also, if you're able to make a screencast showing what you've described, I'll be better able to suggest a course of action--Camtasia can record itself. Just click on its icon in the taskbar after it's been minimized:




Conan.
Photo of brucerothwell

brucerothwell

  • 298 Posts
  • 84 Reply Likes
I have a question about how to zoom an area of the screen up, instead of zooming the entire screen.

It is a technique I have seen in some tutorial videos that show an area of focus by enlarging that area only, and leaving the rest of the screen as is.

It is not unlike doing a "low-light" effect, except the area of focus is just made larger.
Photo of Conan Heiselt

Conan Heiselt, Employee

  • 491 Posts
  • 70 Reply Likes
Hi Bruce,

If I understand what you're referring to, it's pretty easy. I just make a copy of the recording, crop it to just what I want to zoom in on, and then animate it.

Like this: http://www.screencast.com/t/OteJeu7Q

Is that what you want to do?


Conan.
Photo of brucerothwell

brucerothwell

  • 298 Posts
  • 84 Reply Likes
Actually, I cannot get to screencast.com from where I am right now, but before I saw your reply, I created a demo what what I thought would be a good example (which is pretty much what you are suggesting):

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B5P...