WHY does Rendering sometimes FAIL?!?! It's really frustrating!

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  • Updated 5 years ago
I've had times where Camtasia would fail with rendering and the program would need to be closed. I have the trial version and am wondering if the quality is less because it's a trial version. I am interested in buying Camtasia, BUT with it failing the rendering it makes me second guess. I would change it between mp4 with smart player or just mp4 in HD. If i switch it, it sometimes seems to work. I dont know if my laptop's cpu and disk is maxing (i have a high tier gaming laptop, Lenovo, with an i7, etc). 

What causes a rendering to fail?
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Kevin Scrima

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Posted 5 years ago

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Kevin Scrima

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I did produce and share MP4 only up to 1080p and it worked. I tried with MP4 with smartplayer and it failed. Maybe something about smartplayer?
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Joe Morgan

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Camtasia's trial version is full featured. There are no limitations or missing features.

 In a nutshell, Camtasia is a 32 bit Program and can only access about 2 1/2 to 3 GB of RAM Memory. Once it reaches that threshold it will crash every time. As your editing in Camtasia studio, it retains a lot of the information necessary for the editing process. But it tends to retain more information than it actually needs.

 A lot of times. Saving your project. Closing Camtasia. Reopening the program, and then reopening your project. Will free up enough memory to complete your project.

Some people produce their large projects by breaking the video into more than one segment. Producing those segments individually. Then stringing the segments back together and producing them as a final project.

  The reason this works? Is because the original recorded file segments, are larger than the produced segments. Some quality can be lost when using this technique.

Sometime this year, Camtasia 9 is supposed to be coming out. It will be a 64 bit program. 64-bit programs can access all of the RAM memory on your computer. Allowing you to produce much larger videos without issue. How much it actually costs, if it is actually released this year, is all unknown to me. I'm just a guy who has seen this information posted by TechSmith.

In general, if you do produce individual segments and string them together for the final video. If you produce them initially using the AVI format and the " TechSmith screen codec 2 ". The final produced video should be of acceptable quality.

Regards, Joe

(Edited)
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Kevin Scrima

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Thanks. Is it possible that even though the outputted video is 1080 p that the screen quality can be lower?
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lewis.yu

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I experienced similar issues with rendering from multiple source files, with each .MOV file size ranging from 150MB to 190 MB.  Before I bought the s/w, I didn't notice any "64 bit recommended" message.  It'd have been useful to have this highlighted.
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Joe Morgan

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@ Kevin,

Okay, I’ve got a quick little experiment for you to try.

Take a 1080 P video and trim it down to about 30 seconds in duration. Produce it using the MP4 format and default settings.

Start a new project, import the new video you just produced. Export it as an MP4 again with a new name.

Then, once again take that newest produced video, open it Camtasia and export as an MP4. By the time you get to this third production. The video will have deteriorated a lot. The audio will go downhill and the video will not be smooth.

Then, take another new video clip that has never been rendered. Produce it as an AVI with default settings.

Re-produce that video two more times, just like you did with the previous video. When you get to the final render of this video you will see far less quality is loss. But you will see some deterioration. So it’s not ideal and should be avoided whenever possible.

A lot of people don’t realize how much is lost if you cannot  use the original source footage. Once is not that bad, but it still loses some playback quality. This little project will open your eyes.

 So the bottom line is this.  If your video is too large to be produced to 100% completion and the rendering has failed. You may need to break it into segments to complete your project. But in most cases, were talking about a video that's at least 20 to 30 minutes in duration or longer.  I have no trouble with full HD videos that are around 20 minutes long.  I do tutorials so they don’t run longer very often. So it's not something you should need to do on a regular basis. Unless you're producing a lot of lengthy videos.

For shorter videos that fail to render, you should be able to save your project, close Camtasia. You must close the program or it won’t clear its memory 100%.  Reopen Camtasia and produced your video after that.

 Regards, Joe

Look closely at the trees especially. See Image Below, Click to Enlarge

(Edited)

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