Wish list: Audio level meter.

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  • Updated 2 years ago
Merged

This conversation has been merged. Please reference the main conversation: Recorder Audio Meter

It would be great to have an audio level meter so that I can adjust it before sharing my videos.
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S. Shackelford

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Posted 6 years ago

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Conan Heiselt, Employee

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Hi,

I really like this idea. While I can see how it would be useful for me, what's the purpose you have mind for this? What's the problem it solves?

Thanks!

Conan.
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Dave Walker

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We have several different students producing for us using Camtasia Studio.  Without a VU meter,  it is nearly impossible to achieve any kind of uniformity of audio levels between products.  This is very frustrating.  While I am a big fan of Camtasia, the lack of this feature subjectivizes the entire audio toolset, making it inconsistent and unreliable.  This, in tun, really downgrades Camtasia Studio's credibility as a professional tool.  Really hoping you guys can address this issue!
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davemillman

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When producing many videos, with audio mixed in from many sources, we are constantly adjusting levels. We may do this in Camtasia, or in an external audio editor, but we are nearly always rendering the final video from Camtasia.

An audio level meter would make it much easier to maintain a consistent audio volume within a video, and across multiple videos made over a period of time.
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Fred Grover, Champion

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I would support this feature and it would be nice to have. I always use an outside audio editing software or my Pro Audio Setup at home for leveling my audio and any audio I bring in to my videos but not everyone has a setup or wants to pay for a setup like I use. Great idea though and thanks for sharing your thoughts.
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Allen Smith

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Yeah definitely need a peak meter to monitor audio levels. I also have to use an external audio editor to check levels. Seeing audio levels will also allow you to keep consistency so users don't have to adjust their volume on different videos. Also be nice to ability to adjust volume by entering numeric values in addition to having to drag volume up or down in timeline. Dragging volume in timeline move volume in increments but sometimes you need more precise control.
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C.P.

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I'm currently demo-ing Camtasia for Mac, and the inflexibility of the audio (and inconsistency) is driving me nuts.  I *think* that I've applied an audio FX to an entire audio clip, only to (upon playback) discover that it's inconsistent across the track.  I'm considering spending the extra money and getting [a more expensive video editing software] instead - -I know it's like twice as much but it might be worth it if I don't have to freakin' export my audio, fix it somewhere else, re-import it, etc. Whew!!!
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davemillman

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To C.P., 

I don't understand the problem you are having. When you apply an audio FX, it indeed applies to the entire clip. The exception would be if you have defined a Custom effect, which by definition changes across the custom arrow.

I capture and edit audio in Audacity (free), but do all of the level adjustment, clip speed and other occasional effects within Camtasia for Mac. Works great.
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C.P.

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It applies it, but unevenly. That is, if I try to reduce the volume by 30%, it will only reduce it by that much in some parts. I have to listen to the whole clip and manually change it.  I don't know why it does this -- it certainly shouldn't !  It's a total pain to have to capture audio separately via audacity.  It would be great for there to be more audio controls and more flexibility built in, which is why I'm looking at other solutions. 
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demarest

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The only time this should happen is if you have the red and green tabs separated from the play head to select only part of a clip. Also, if you have different clips on the same track, any adjustments you make will only apply to the clips highlighted, not the entire track.
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C.P.

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Yes, I know that it "should" only happen with the tabs, but it's not actually working that way. If it were working the way it's supposed to, I wouldn't mention it on a thread like this. 

I fully understand that adjustments will only happen to highlighted clips. Thanks so much for your condescending and unhelpful answer, though.  I regret that I even came on to this thread. 
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synbryo

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I also support this feature. We have a lot of content that we try to
calibrate to an average volume. The sources are often different, so we
have to guess, to some extent, when volume is "about right". This
doesn't feel professionnal and a simple meter could solve this while
also allowing peaking monitoring.
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Daavpuke

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I would like to add my name to that wishlist. Having an audio mixer is vital to me, to know if sound levels are on par. I'm hard of hearing, so I often get complaints that my video sound levels are off and without seeing it range in a track-by-track mix, I have no idea whether one sound drowns out the other or not.
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jrob

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from the feedback I see on Camtasia it seems audio is not its strongest point.

Just an idea tossed in the air... Maybe it would be better to sublet the whole audio issue to another program? An open source, with special licencing, or something like that... because a tool that does only audio can get quite complex even without video! So a plug-in as audacity may be an answer. Just dreaming out loud.

I miss autoducking myself: it's when one audio track reduces its level when others are present. It makes it easy to use background music with occasional speeches.
(Edited)
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skipper_josh

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Yes some possibilities in this case camtasia should integrate. Not only for output, for input (recording by microphone) too. What I can not comprehend is, that there are barely to find scales or meters at the controls. In spoken comments you find a shift register with "low" and "high". But there is no scale where you can set and note the level for a next project where you need the same option. The level at this location only can be set visual and not exactly. 
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Kristen F

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
Measure output audio accurately with an audio meter. (For use during editing, NOT just recording.).


How do I ensure audio levels are consistent across projects, when there is no audio meter or decibel meter for the output audio? Using the system tray audio meter is not accurate, since other editors using different computers do not necessarily use the same soundcard, which is what affects the system audio meter levels in the system tray. Can Camtasia please add an output meter that corresponds to the timeline, so that we can measure audio objectively, rather than subjectively measure audio by how a waveform "looks" on the timeline?
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Jessie O'Donnell, Influencer Relations Coordinator

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Hi Kristen,

Thank you for this suggestion. I can see where this would be helpful. I don't have any updates on the status of this request, but please keep an eye on this thread for future updates.
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Kristen F

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That would be great, thank you Jessie!
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Jay Couvillon

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I second that!  It's very difficult to ensure that my levels are consistent without a meter.

Another request I would make is the ability to select multiple clips and change the audio levels of everything at once.  Also, being able to type in a value rather than moving the green level indicator would be useful.

Thanks!
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Dave Walker

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Can't imagine that the coding would be that difficult.
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vincent.croos

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Is there an update on this? I need to be able to adjust my audio intensity (decibel) like in Premiere Pro.
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tony.lima

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I, too, would very much like this feature.  I have, on occasion, exported the audio track, cleaned it up with Audacity (open-source shareware), then added it back.  Major pain.
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Dave Walker

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Yes. However, the meter probably won't eliminate your need to do audio sweetening in Audacity. I find that the noise reduction filter in Audacity is amazing; so much so that it is now part of my standard post production workflow. But, I'm kind of a nerd that way. Camtasia needs a meter because it's really impossible for multiple producers to produce videos that have consistent sound levels. I can't imagine that this is a huge thing for them. This code is already written; it's mostly copy and paste.
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tony.lima

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Dave, many thanks for the reply.  I like "audio sweetening!"  One more question.  My lovely wife, the in-house audio expert, suggested using Final Cut Pro to smooth out the audio.  Any opinions about that?

Thanks again,
T
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Dave Walker

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Yes.  Final Cut is a great video editor; I use it daily.  However, it just doesn't have the audio tools that Audacity and Soundtrack Pro have.  Final Cut is supposed to flow into Soundtrack Pro for audio editing; however, I've found Audacity to have all the tools I need, and it is much simpler to use.  Others might disagree. 
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tony.lima

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Thanks very much.  I'll be sure to let my lovely wife know.
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dbrown

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This is quite an important feature as ACX has a very specific db range for submitted files and I have no way of knowing whether the audio falls within that range or not (at least not without shifting to yet another SW package). I don't need a very complex meter and from what I read the hard part of the coding has _already_ been done - the system is getting some sort of specific read and converting to the red-yellow-green chart, so exposing the underlying db info should not be an issue.
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Dave Walker

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One would think...We've been asking for this for at least 2 years, now.
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Dale Towner

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Hear Hear for even master audio level metering or an accurate reference for the existing audio waveform/s which exist in the timeline. 

I've just found out that everything i've created for the past year and a half have been about +3dB over unity. The trouble of using an editor which doesn't have accurate metering and uploading into a system which has none.
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Jonas Collin

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Please add an audio level meter! The whole idea with camtasia is that it should contain everything a teacher need to produce a presentation. If you have to use other more complex programs you can use free screen captures instead. I'm working with professional development of university teachers, and most of them doesn't want to learn complex and expensive professional media editing programs. Camtasia would be an excellent choice,  but they don't want the audio to suck.
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Dale Towner

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I'm in the same boat too.
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Caoj

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Please, add an audio level meter on next version of Camtasia. And it's importante to explain to users about best levels for videos.
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wiesemar

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And still no audio level meter in camtasia 9...  Please add it,  without level meter, its nearly impossible to get consistent audio levels... And the possibility to increase or decrease audio level in dB values would be nice too.

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