Youtube 1440p With Camtasia Mac

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How can I upload screen recordings to YouTube from Camtasia Mac which are 1440p



I am using an iMac 27 inch screen with a native resolution of 2560 x 1440

Do I have to lower the screen resolution of the monitor and then create a custom project size in Camtasia, if so, what would be your suggestions ?

Thanks
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Ian Barber

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Posted 8 months ago

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Paul Middlin, Employee

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You can upload them as-is to YouTube (that is, very large) and that will work fine- YouTube will reencode it to all of the different sizes you see above.

If you think your audience is generally going to be watching it at a lower resolution, then you may choose to lower your resolution before recording. This is because taking your large (hi-res) recording, and shrinking it down to smaller screens / lower bandwidth, means losing some quality in the shrinking. So in that case, starting smaller gives people a bigger, clearer view of your content.

But, if you think people will have big screens and high bandwidth, then carry on with the high resolution; it's pretty, right?
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davemillman

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Paul,

Many years ago we all spent lots of time trying to avoid any re-encoding by YouTube, because their compressors were crap. Then they got bought by Google and Google invested lots of cash to improve YouTube's technology. Now their compressors are best-in-class for anyone except fancy cinematographers. So the workflow for best quality is: 
  1. Edit and export from Camtasia at the highest resolution you want users to have access to (I've never gone above 1080p for my industrial work, but some cinematographers do).
  2. Use the least possible compression in Camtasia (30,000 KB/s). Expect file sizes in the gigabytes if your video is more than a few minutes long.
  3. Upload that monster file to YouTube (or Vimeo, which gives much more control over distribution) and let their server farms do the hard work.
YouTube or Vimeo will then create all the different resolutions from your highest-quality starting video. You can even download all the compressed videos to examine them frame-by-frame, or to host on a secure streaming server behind a firewall. I don't compress anything locally anymore, there's no benefit.
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Paul Middlin, Employee

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I agree with everything Dave said here. I just wanted to clarify one (complex) point. As Dave said, he doesn't go higher than 1080p. That's mostly about your audience- lower resolution and lower bandwidth content will get made for you automatically, which is awesome. But, if you think most of your users are in this boat, do them a favor and make your content look 'bigger' at these low resolutions so that it is clearer to view.
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Ian Barber

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Thanks Paul, just to clarify, Do I have to lower the screen resolution of the monitor and then create a custom project size in Camtasia to get to 1400p ?
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Paul Middlin, Employee

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If you're aiming for 1440, and that's what your screen is, then there is one more thing you may need to do. By default, Camtasia makes your project smaller (1080p I think is the current default). But, you can change this either after you record by modifying the canvas size, OR if you want to change it all the time there is a preference:
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Ian Barber

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After doing what you suggested, my test videos on Youtube were still only showing a max option of 1080p and not the 1440 so this got me wondering. After some digging around, I found the reason why 1440 was not an available option on Youtube.

The Reason...
Upon further inspection, I discovered that Youtube stores different kinds of video on their servers, encoded either in VP9 or the older H264 codec. Safari has no VP9 support...so it gets automatically served a H264 version from Youtube (you can verify codec by right clicking > stats for nerds). Chrome supports VP9 so gets served that version...
I fired up Chrome, and sure enough, 1440 is available so it looks as though Safari is not supporting VP9 and thats why is falling back to 1080.

I am quite surprised by this as I thought Apple was ahead of the game
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bretts

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I output/share/render at 3840/2160 in Camtasia. The subsequent .MP4 is uploaded to YouTube, and after 20 minutes of YT processing, all resolutions are available to viewers. 4k and 2k (1440).